Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology Las Vegas, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Symposium
Location: Hampton Events Center A

Session Introduction

Mirjana Menkovska

Sts. Cyril and Methodius University
Macedonia

Title: Wheat technological quality in relation with the composition of gluten proteins-gliadins and HMW glutenins

Time : 09:00-09:45

Speaker
Biography:

Mirjana Menkovska is full Professor at the Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Institute of Animal Science, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia. She graduated at the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy in Skopje in 1976, she took M.S. Degree in Instrumental Analysis at the same University in 1982, and Ph.D. degree in Food Technology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1993. She was research visiting scientist at many known research centers in the world such as Grain Marketing research Center in Manhattan, Kansas, USA and Cereal Research Institute in Detmold, Germany and other. She published more than hundred thirty papers in domestic and foreign scientific journals; and participated at more than sixty scientific meetings in the country and abroad. She was leader of many domestic and international scientific projects. She is author of a scientific book and she has translated three books from English into Macedonian language, and has reviewed two books. She is senator at the University Senate of the University in Skopje and was its Rector candidate in 2012. Her field of expertise is food technology-cereal science and technology, food processing and new products developing, functional food, quality and safety of food and feed and food instrumental analysis. She was awarded for scientific book in 2004 and got Recognition for contribution to the Eu/ICC Cereal Conference 2002 “ECC 2002-ERA”. She was for a long time member of AACC, RACI and ICC National Delegate, as well as of many other world scientific associations and member of many Scientific and Organizing Committees at international and domestic scientific conferences.

Abstract:

The principal factors for wheat quality are proteins. Bread-making properties depend on the quality and quantity of the wheat proteins. Gluten proteins, formed from gliadins and glutenins during flour mixing with water are a reliable indicator of flour strength. In these investigations biochemical analytical methods (PAGE, SDS-PAGE, HPLC and HPCE) were applied on wheat varieties in order varietal biochemical and genetic identifications of the gliadins and HMW glutenins to be performed. As immediate products of DNK, gluten proteins give electrophoretic and chromatographic data that are characteristic for each particular wheat variety.
The aim of these investigations was to determine the composition of gluten proteins of domestic bread-wheat varieties and of their milled products; to identify the wheat varieties on the basis of the composition of gluten proteins, a well as to find relationship between the composition of gluten proteins and the technological quality characteristics of the kernel, flour and bread.
Among the investigated wheat varieties variability of the alleles from the particular Gli and Glu loci was determined. The total of 25 different alleles from the all six Gli and nine alleles from three Glu loci were identified. The Glu-1 score for the investigated wheat varieties was also determined. The existence of a significant relationship between the presence of particular gliadin blocks and HMW glutenin subunits and particular characteristics of technological quality of the kernel and milled flours was determined. These quality characteristics represent the direct and indirect indicators of the functional properties of wheat-milling and baking.
The results obtained in the presented investigations giving a new insight into wheat technological quality are of great importance for predicting the wheat technological quality in wheat breeding of new wheat varieties with desired quality, as well as for domestic and international wheat trade and the food processing industry based on wheat.

  • Symposium
Location: Hampton Events Center A

Session Introduction

Ian Watson

University of Glasgow
UK

Title: Microalgae as a sustainable food source

Time : 09:45-10:30

Speaker
Biography:

Ian Watson’s first degree was in applied physics, followed by a Ph.D. from the engineering Faculty at the University of Glasgow in “Optimizing the gaseous discharge and optical coupling of a pulsed CO2 laser” which was specifically designed for material processing of reflective and refractory materials. In the early 1990s he began to research the effects of high power laser beams on microorganisms and laser sterilization and inactivation. He has published on the direct effect of a range of lasers and their efficacy on treating different substrates, including solids, liquids and air and a range of microorganisms from E. coli to B. globigii, an anthrax simulant. As well as building lasers and laser scanning inactivation systems he has developed combined systems for decontamination and inactivation applications. These systems comprised: lasers, UV, pulsed flash lamp systems, microwave and chemical treatments. Laser and plasma systems have been specifically designed, fabricated and successfully tested for treating air.

Abstract:

With the world’s population set to grow to 9.7 billion by 2050, the world is facing ever increasing demands for a reliable protein supply. Furthermore, production of meat is energy intensive and requires large quantities of feed, water and fertilizers. The feed used for livestock in the USA could feed 800 million people. There is an urgent need to develop alternative sources of protein. There is global interest in exploiting microalgae for biofuel production, however, with their high protein and carbohydrate content there is significant opportunity to develop microalgae based food products that can impact substantially on food sustainability. Current state of the art methods of growing and harvesting microalgae at small and large scale will be presented and examples of food products currently on the market identified. The potential of microalgae as a food source will be discussed.

  • Track 11: Food Regulatory Affairs and Sensory Analysis
    Track 13: Current Trends in Food Technology
    Track 14: Food Security and Food Policy
    Track 15: Agricultural Biotechnology
    Track 16: Fermentation Technology, Bioprocess and Cell Culture
Location: Hampton Events Center A
Speaker

Chair

Tong Zhao

University of Georgia
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Zinnai Angela

University of Pisa
Italy

Session Introduction

Tong Zhao

University of Georgia
USA

Title: Efficacy of a novel bactericide for elimination of biofilm in food processing facilities

Time : 10:30-10:50

Speaker
Biography:

Tong Zhao received his degree in Medicine from China. Since then he has spent most of his career (26 years) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Georgia for developing better ways to detect human pathogens in foods, animals, and water through various approaches and intervention methods to reduce contamination of foodborne pathogens in animals and foods. He has more than 50 papers, 5 approved patents and 4 pending patents and was awarded as “Inventor of the Year 2010, by University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. for the Discovery of Highly Effective and Practical Treatments for Reducing Contamination of Foods by Harmful Microorganisms”.

Abstract:

A novel bactericide composed of levulinic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), both individually designated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as generally recognized as safe for direct addition to food was developed for effectively killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium. The dynamics of cross-contamination of L. monocytogenes, S. Typhimurium, and E. coli O157:H7 from contaminated deli foods to slicers and from contaminated slicers to deli foods. After slicing surface-inoculated foods, pathogens were recovered from five contact surfaces on slicers, with significantly (P ≤ 0.05) less transfer to the blades than to meat grips and carriage trays. At an initial inoculum of ca. 8.5 log CFU/blade, the transfer of pathogens decreased logarithmically from an initial count of 4.0 log CFU/slice to <1.5 log CFU on the sixtieth slice. Treatment of blades with a mixture of levulinic acid (1%) plus SDS (0.1%) as a foam reduces the three pathogens by at least 6 log CFU/blade within 1 min. This combination of chemicals also may have potential for use as an effective sanitizer for large-scale applications in food processing facilities. The ability of L. monocytogenes, Salmonella, and Shiga Toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) to grow as biofilms on the surface of stainless steel at 100% relative humidity and 21°C for 72 h. The combined activity of levulinic acid plus SDS was determined to be bactericidal for the three pathogens grow in bio-films with the highest concentrations (3% + 2%) achieved the highest log reduction (>6 log CFU/coupon). In addition, heat (80°C) and lactic acid (3%) indicated a synergistic work to kill the bio-film cells. These two ways may be used as tools to mitigate the problem of bio-films in food processing facilities.

Speaker
Biography:

Angela Zinnai completed his Ph.D. at the age of 25 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is an associate professor of food technology at Pisa University. In 2008, she received a “Special Mention” at “Montana Premium” for Food Science Research (with her colleague Venturi F.). She published more than 80 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for research projects and papers. She was a scientific author for an original patent (PT2009A000018) that received a “Special mention of the Jury” at 24° SIMEI. She was a chair at Bioprocess 2013 conference (Kansas City, USA) conducted by OMICS Group.

Abstract:

Phenolic compounds play a key role in the quality and health benefits of a wine so that, in the last twenty years, many devices have been created to assist the winemaker in obtaining products characterized by a good structure and color intensity and strongly linked to its territory of origin. In this experimental work a versatile innovative tank was set up to allow the automation of the processes of fermentation, maturation and storage of wines, including the mixing and retention of suspended solids (maturation on lees). The work has been carried out according to the following steps:
• First phase: red winemaking, in Vine and Wine research center of DAFE, by utilizing both a first prototype of small volume (V = 5 hL) and a traditional tank having the same geometrical characteristics.
• Second phase: having made the necessary improvements, an innovative tank (Patent number PT2009A000018) of greater volume (V = 50 hL) was used in winemaking in a famous Tuscan farm, comparing its operating effectiveness with a traditional tank having the same volume and maintained at the same temperature;
• Third phase: Which is ongoing, white wine making process was carried out without using any chemical additives with special reference to sulfur dioxide or sulphites. The preliminary results of this experimentation, seem to underline how the new tank is able to produce high quality white wines which contain low level of chemical additives which can provoke adverse reactions (ex: skin rashes and irritations) in sensitive people.

Break: Coffee Break 11:10-11:25 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Francesca Venturi completed his Ph.D. at the age of 28 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is a researcher in food technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a "Special Mention" at "Montana Premium" for food science research (with her colleague Zinnai A.). She published more than 70 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for ACS journals. She was an author in an original patent of Pisa University (RM2010A000617) for extra-virgin olive oil extraction by addition of CO2. She was an invited speaker by Omics Group at Bioprocess 2013 (Kansas City, USA).

Abstract:

The composition of olive oil is strictly connected to both the raw material characteristics and the oil processing technology which can deeply influence on its quality. The main object of this work has been the development of an innovative extraction technology involving the addition of a cryogen (solid CO2) to the olives in order to obtain a better extraction yield and oil characterized by a stronger link with the raw material and so with its production area. The direct contact “CO2, s↔olives” causes a partial freezing of intracellular water that increases its volume and provokes the cellular crash which promotes the extraction of oil and of other olive compounds. The effect induced on oil yield and on quality by olives cultivars, maturity index, moisture contents, time and conditions adopted during the olives storage and amount of added CO2,s were analyzed and compared with data obtained utilizing the same raw materials without cryogen addition. This innovative technology has allowed extracting a virgin olive oil richer in Vitamin E and other bioactive components able to increase the oil antioxidant activity, nutritional value and shelf-life. Because of food traceability and safety represent key factors for ensuring food quality and protecting consumers’ interests, in this work they were also presented the results of experimental tests on olive oil aimed to develop analytical methods able to evaluate the influence of the addition of “carbonic snow” during crushing or kneading by comparing the olive oil elemental profiles obtained with or without the CO2, s addition.

Speaker
Biography:

Ole Bonnichsen completed his Ph.D. in 2012 and is currently employed as an assistant professor at the department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen in Denmark. His area of research includes all aspects of economic valuation, cost-benefit analysis and stated preference methods. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers in international journals in these areas and has also taught at both the bachelor and master level at the University of Copenhagen.

Abstract:

Despite a relatively high Danish consumption of organic foods, it is a policy aim to increase this consumption further. The objective of this study is to explore the role of geographical origin and sales outlet as catalysts in this respect. A Choice Experiment conducted with Danish citizens is used for quantitative measurement of consumer preferences for improvements in three types of quality attributes: product origin (local, Danish, imported), production method (organic, pesticide free, increased animal welfare, conventional), and purchase location (supermarket, specialty shop, farm outlet) for six food types (bread, carrots, cheese, milk, salami, salmon). For all food types, the results indicate a positive preference for attributes like organic or increased animal welfare, as well as for Danish and locally produced food. Respondents also generally prefer the supermarket purchase location. These findings may suggest that domestic origin and high availability (in supermarkets) are important determinants for product choice for most food types, and a policy targeting these aspects might be appropriate to stimulate the demand for organic foods.

Speaker
Biography:

Hein Timmerman is Global sector expert Processed Food at Diversey, part of Sealed Air, a US based company with expertise in food science and microbiology to create solutions that protects and enhances the food and beverage supply chain. Over 22 years he is working for Sealed Air in Food & Beverages in Engineering, Sales Management, Business Development and Technical Management, he has developed an expert opinion in Dairy, Processed Food Technology and CIP techniques. Prior to this, he has worked 7 years for the Swedish based Alfa-Laval in design and construction of food production plants. He is an EHEDG certified trainer, chairman of the Belgian Regional Section and member of the Executive Committee. He has published and authored several papers and lectures at food conferences. Hein Timmerman has a Master degree in Food Technology and an MBA.

Abstract:

Food laws and regulations provide food producers and food equipment manufacturers with the requirements to manage http://foodtechnology.conferenceseries.com/potential food safety risks. The globally influential international food standards Codex Alimentarius, published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nation and the World Health Organization, sets up a global framework of general principles of food hygiene. Supporting this target, the European Commission has developed several European regulations and directives that primarily address the food processor and require that food is produced in a safe manner. However despite all joint efforts over the last decades and the fact that most Food Business Operators are following one or more recognized certifications schemes, it still goes wrong. To achieve good design that takes into account regulatory and clean ability requirements, the equipment manufacturer will need a solid foundation of experienced people, the willingness to strive for innovative solutions, and commitment to ongoing education and learning. Establishing these foundational elements is vitally important for food equipment manufacturers who aim to achieve the ultimate goals food safety.
The principal goal of EHEDG, the European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group, is the promotion of safe food by improving hygienic engineering and design in all aspects of food manufacture. EHEDG actively supports European legislation, which requires that handling, preparation processing and packaging of food is done hygienically using hygienic machinery and in hygienic premises (EC Directive 2006/42/EC for Machinery, EN 1672-2 and EN ISO 14159 Hygiene requirement). EHEDG enables safe food production by providing guidance as an authority on hygienic engineering and design for food manufactured in or imported into Europe.

Michael A. Gragasin

Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization
Philippines

Title: Development of improved compact corn mill

Time : 12:25-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Michael Gragasin is a Supervising Science Research Specialist at the Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization where he led the implementation of projects geared towards achieving food sufficiency in the Philippines, i.e. development of a village-type corn mill, cassava belt-dryer, compact rice mill with impeller huller, etc. He spearheaded the formulation of the National Mechanization Roadmap for Rice, Corn, and Cassava. In 2013, he was awarded the Most Outstanding Agricultural Engineer in the Field of Postharvest Technology and Food Engineering by the Philippine Society of Agricultural Engineers. He also became a post doctorate fellow in Chiba University under the Japanese Government JASSO Program in 2010.

Abstract:

This research has successfully designed and developed an innovative compact corn mill with milling capacity of 250 kg/h. The research aimed to improve the current design of village-type corn mill that satisfies the minimum product recovery of 64% and degerming efficiency of 80% as set by the Philippine Agricultural Engineering Standard (PAES) for corn mill. Majority if not all of the available village-type corn mill in the Philippines have not satisfied both these two basic quality standards of PAES and as such, produces high postharvest losses. Based on the country’s supply and utilization account, the average consumption of corn as food was estimated at 1.675 million metric tons in 2013 or roughly 14 million Filipinos have utilized corn grits as their staple food. Performance tests revealed that the newly developed technology has an output capacity of 160.8 kg/h with product recovery of 64.2%. The degerming efficiency of the corn mill is high at 91.45%. The total operating cost per kg output is estimated at Php1.18/kg (US$0.026/kg). The power consumption of the corn mill at full operation is 6.26KW/h. This research has invented a degermer using a hexagonal screen huller with counter flow screen to separate the endosperm from the germ, tip cap, and hull of the corn grain. Such design is totally different from the traditional corn mill in the Philippines that uses emery stone or steel huller as its degerming mechanism. It also innovate the grading assembly of corn mill by introducing a 3-layer rotary slotted sheet cylinder, instead of the commonly used oscillating sieve grader, to sort corn grits No. 10 & 12; No. 14, 16, 18; corn flour; and, grits greater than No. 10. The improved hammer mill introduces a 36 spokes that is made of flat steel bars sharpen at one side. A pneumatic conveyor is provided to separately convey corn grain and grits to the hopper, thus, requiring only one operator of the corn mill.

Fahad M. Bin jasass

King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Saudi Arabia

Title: Chemical composition of single cell protein produced from date syrup (Dips)

Time : 12:45-13:05

Speaker
Biography:

Fahad M. Bin jasass is working as an Associate Professor at King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Single cell protein (SCP) was produced by propagation of two yeast strains, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 1530 and Candida utilis 70163 (DSMZ), on date syrup (Dips) substrate under different propagation conditions. The obtained SCP is intended to be used as fish and poultry feeding diets. The chemical composition, and hence eventually the nutritive value, of the so produced SCP was affected by the propagation conditions, especially the substrate feeding rate and the inoculum size at the beginning of fermentation. Under optimized propagation conditions, the amino acid composition of both yeast strains exhibited a good quality exhibiting most of the essential amino acids (for fish and poultry), especially lysine and sulfur containing amino acids. The biomass, especially that of S. cerevisiae, contained many essential vitamins of the B group. Moreover, the biomass of both yeasts contained high amounts of many important nutrient minerals such as calcium, manganese, iron and zinc. Fatty acids of the produced SCP were mostly of the preferred unsaturated ones.

Speaker
Biography:

Gamal A. El-Sharnouby has completed his Ph.D. from Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. He is the professor of food science and nutrition. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute. He is member in many professional societies. He has attended more than 20 national and international conferences and scientific symposia. He has supervised many of the Masters and Ph.D. students. He has worked as a scientific consultant for many food factories. He has participated in the development of many of the food standards. He has experience in food science and technology, functional food, natural pigments, food safety, fruits processing, determine the expire date of food for human consumption. He is a principle investigator in many food science and technology projects.

Abstract:

In date syrup manufacturing, date fruits are mixed with a suitable amount of water with heating at a temperature greater than 50OC for about 1 h. These conditions are not satisfactory for extraction greater amount of liquid sugar (date syrup). In addition, overheating for an extended period of time could damage nutritious materials and also changes product’s color. In this study, pectinase/cellulase treatments and sonication process were used to achieve maximum syrup extraction from a date variety (Reziz). Ultrasound was applied for improving the quantity and quality of extracted syrup. The following variables were examined: fruit/water ratio, mixture of enzymes, ultrasonic intensity and temperature. Date extract was concentrated by a rotary evaporator until 70 % total solids to produce higher quality syrup. Physicochemical properties of each collected sample during process were evaluated. Rheological properties of syrup were evaluated at different temperatures and concentration. Results showed that sonication under the proper conditions (U2 at 20 kHz - 25% of power, 20 OC and water/fruits ratio of 3/1) could lead to a higher extraction in a shorter time with a better physicochemical quality of syrup in comparison to enzymes and classical methods of extraction. Data indicated the possibility of employing ultrasound or enzymes (50 U of pectinase and 5 U of cellulase for 120 min at 40OC) with ultrasound processes for producing greater syrup amount highly desirable for use in food product development.

Break: Lunch Break 13:25-14:10 @ Coral B
14:10-15:00 Award Ceremony