Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology Las Vegas, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Symposium
Location: Hampton Events Center A

Session Introduction

Ian Watson

University of Glasgow
UK

Title: Combining technologies for food decontamination and extending the shelf life of fruit and vegetables

Time : 09:00-09:45

Speaker
Biography:

Ian Watson’s first degree was in applied physics, followed by a Ph.D. from the engineering Faculty at the University of Glasgow in “Optimizing the gaseous discharge and optical coupling of a pulsed CO2 laser” which was specifically designed for material processing of reflective and refractory materials. In the early 1990s he began to research the effects of high power laser beams on microorganisms and laser sterilization and inactivation. He has published on the direct effect of a range of lasers and their efficacy on treating different substrates, including solids, liquids and air and a range of microorganisms from E. coli to B. globigii, an anthrax simulant. As well as building lasers and laser scanning inactivation systems he has developed combined systems for decontamination and inactivation applications. These systems comprised: lasers, UV, pulsed flash lamp systems, microwave and chemical treatments. Laser and plasma systems have been specifically designed, fabricated and successfully tested for treating air.

Abstract:

Providing consumers with safe food with sufficient shelf-life remains a critical challenge for the food industry. Food poisoning remains a significant problem worldwide and costs the USA alone an estimated $152B and kills 5000 people per year. Globally, between 1.2-2.0 Billion tons of food produced each year is wasted, in part due to limited shelf-life. A range of systems have been designed, built and evaluated at the University of Glasgow, UK, utilizing a diverse range of technologies; from lasers, microwaves, ultrasonic, pulsed light, UV, and chemical methods. These technologies have been combined to reduce levels of contamination on different produce and extend their shelf-life. Some specific examples of these different treatments and systems will be given.

  • Symposium
Location: Hampton Events Center A
Speaker
Biography:

Ozlem Tokusoglu has completed her Ph.D. at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Department of Food Engineering at 2001.She is currently working as Associate Professor Dr faculty member in Celal Bayar University Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. Tokuşoğlu performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as visiting professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, and Pullman, Washington, USA during April-May 2010. She organized and directed as Conference Chair the International Congress entitled ANPFT2012 (Advanced Non-thermal Processing in Food Technology: Effects on Quality and Shelf-Life of Food and Beverages in May, 2012 at Kusadasi-Aegean,Turkey (www.anpft2012.org). She served as organizing committee member at 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Nutritional Science & Therapy Conference in July 2013 at Philadelphia, USA. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of International Journal of Food Science and Technology (IJFST) by Wiley Publisher, USA and Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment (JFAE) by WFL Publisher, Finland. She published the scientific edited two book entitled Fruit and Cereal Bio-actives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, USA Publisher and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders is in progress.

Abstract:

Will be updated soon

  • Track 5: Food Processing and Packaging Technologies
    Track 6: Current and Future Applications of Probiotic Science
    Track 8: Food and Public Health
Location: Hampton Events Center A
Speaker

Chair

Mirjana Menkovska

Sts. Cyril and Methodius University
Macedonia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Alison Burton Shepherd

Kings College London
UK

Session Introduction

Annette C. Bentley

American Celiac Society
USA

Title: Development of gluten-free/milk-free french bread

Time : 10:30-10:50

Speaker
Biography:

Annette C. Bentley has obtained M.S. degree in Medical Education from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 2003. She has also obtained a M.S. degree in Food Science from Louisiana State University in May of 2013. She founded and serves as the President of the American Celiac Society. She has been published in the Journal of General Psychology and the Who Sprue (American Celiac Newsletter) the Lifeline (CSAUSA newsletter) and the Eucharistic Ministry. She has done many presentations at conference throughout the world

Abstract:

Approximately 6% of children and 4% of adults in the United States (US) have food allergies. Milk allergy is reported to be one of the most common food allergies affecting as high as 7% in the US. Celiac disease affects approximately 1% of the US population. Autism is estimated to affect over 673,000 in the US. Celiacs are required to be on a gluten free diet for life and are recommended to eliminate milk from their diet. The same recommendations are made for autism. The gluten grains identified are wheat, oats, barley and rye and any by-products or cross-bred grains of these products. Foods containing milk and milk by-products include those with casein, whey, curds, and glycomacropeptide (GMP). Since most meals contain some type of bread product, a study of several local specialty stores and groceries to establish the availability of gluten-free food bread that were also milk-free was performed. Of the bread products available only couple products were also milk-free. All the bread products were found in the freezer and contained ice particles. Additionally, the only types of bread were bagels and sliced bread. An earlier study revealed gluten-free bread products was the most unsatisfactory of all gluten free products. The conclusion of search for gluten free breads that were also milk free was that there was a need to develop a desirable bread product. Two gluten-free milk-free French breads were developed comparable to wheat French bread. Several gluten-free flours and combination gluten-free flours were tested using the Rapid Visco Analyzer (RVA). Texture, color, microbiological analyses and gluten testing procedures were performed. General and target sensory population studies were performed. The non-Celiac population results revealed marginal acceptability. The Celiac population sensory study rated the gluten-free milkfree breads as acceptable. Intent to purchase both gluten-free loaves of bread was rated acceptable.

Mirjana Menkovska

Sts. Cyril and Methodius University
Mavedonia

Title: The healthy beverage of kombucha-A key for the eternal health and the remedy for the whole body

Time : 10:50-11:10

Speaker
Biography:

Mirjana Menkovska is full Professor at the Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Institute of Animal Science, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia. She graduated at the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy in Skopje in 1976, she took M.S. Degree in Instrumental Analysis at the same University in 1982, and Ph.D. degree in Food Technology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1993. She was research visiting scientist at many known research centers in the world such as Grain Marketing research Center in Manhattan, Kansas, USA and Cereal Research Institute in Detmold, Germany and other. She published more than hundred thirty papers in domestic and foreign scientific journals; and participated at more than sixty scientific meetings in the country and abroad. She was leader of many domestic and international scientific projects. She is author of a scientific book and she has translated three books from English into Macedonian language, and has reviewed two books. She is senator at the University Senate of the University in Skopje and was its Rector candidate in 2012. Her field of expertise is food technology-cereal science and technology, food processing and new products developing, functional food, quality and safety of food and feed and food instrumental analysis. She was awarded for scientific book in 2004 and got Recognition for contribution to the Eu/ICC Cereal Conference 2002 “ECC 2002-ERA”. She was for a long time member of AACC, RACI and ICC National Delegate, as well as of many other world scientific associations and member of many Scientific and Organizing Committees at international and domestic scientific conferences.

Abstract:

Today we are more often witnesses of a progressively returning to the natural healing methods, to the remedies and foods of natural origin. This is one of the reasons of the great popularity of the healthy beverage known as kombucha. kombucha represents a symbiotic community of yeast mushrooms and lactic acid bacteria nourishing with sugar in green or black tea and producing valuable substances such as glucuronic, lactic and pholic acid, vitamin C and B group vitamins, amino acids, and antibiotic components. Originating from the far East, kombucha today like in the past centuries is used around the world as an refreshing beverage, also as a remedy for treatment of numerous diseases. Being a main topic of numerous scientific papers, as well as the statistics from a survey over a group of several hundred people from all over the world who share their experiences with kombucha on a daily basis, this healthy beverage has confirmed its healing action which is based on its marvelous composition. In this paper home and domestic industrial methods for preparing the beverage as well as other healthy products of kombucha tea mushroom are presented, revealing the key of its positive effects on the whole body in prevention and healing of diseases.

Speaker
Biography:

Francesco Dell’Endice holds a PhD in Spectroscopy from University of Zurich and has a background in Aerospace Engineering. During his PhD he has been involved in building a hyperspectral camera for the European Space Agency, whose goal was to measure the distribution of biochemical properties in natural targets such as plants, trees, water and soil from a satellite. In early 2010, he founded QualySense with the mission of bringing biochemical sorting in the food industry. To date, QualySense has won several prizes and has closed several projects with leading food and seed companies worldwide.

Abstract:

The consumer preferences for certain food products strongly depends on the quality of the raw materials such as grains and beans, which influence: 1. The sensorial properties of the end-products 2. The possibility of applying health related claims 3. The overall nutritional value. Today, raw material quality is measured on an average basis and no insight on its variance isavailable: e.g. two lots of wheat grains may have the same average protein content but very different standard deviation. This is due to the fact that there are no high-speed single kernel analyzers. QualySense team has developed, with the support of the USDA and of Swiss research laboratories, the QSorter Explorer robot, a high-speed single kernel analyzer and sorter with a multi-kg-per-hour. The QSorter Explorer transports each kernel at the speed of 50 per second. A Near-Infrared reflectance spectrum between 900 nm and 1700 nm and a color image are taken per each kernel and processed by artificial intelligence algorithms to concurrently measure quality parameters such as biochemical properties (e.g. protein, oil, sugar), physical parameters(e.g. size, shape, color), or defects (e.g. broken, shriveled, infected by diseases). The QSorter Explorer is mainly used to: 4. Develop novel food and drink products sorting kernels based on quality criteria 5. Accelerate manual quality inspection procedures in processing plants To date, some of the successful applications of the QSorter Explorer robot include: • Identification of other cereals in lots of “gluten-free” oats. • Measurement of the ratio between Oleic and Linoleic acids in peanuts. • Prediction of coffee cup quality from unroasted beans. • Prediction of baking quality parameters from unprocessed wheat kernels. QualySense is also developing a higher capacity version of the QSorter robot.

Break: Coffee Break 11:30-11:45 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Etienne Dako has completed his Ph.D. and M.Sc. in Food Microbiology at Laval University in Quebec, Canada. He holds two Certificates in Genetics of Populations and Organic Chemistry, and a M.Sc. degree in biochemistry from the Université d’Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire. He is also involved in several universities as associate and researcher, including: Université Nangui Abrogoua (Côte d’Ivoire) and Senghor University in Alexandria (Egypt). He was the president of the committee of graduate student in his department over 11 years. He is, since 2007, the president of Animal Care Committee of University of Moncton and member of Academic Senate (since 2006). He has presented numerous seminars and conferences on his research, and published over forty articles in scientific journals. He was nominated last year and this year as a member of Canadian delegates for Codex Committee on Food Labelling (CCFL), Joint FAO/WHO food standards programme. He also served as a delegate and chairman respectively at the first Global Food security in Rabat (Marocco) and AGRAR-2013: 1st conference of African research on agriculture, food, and nutrition in Yamossokoro (Côte d’Ivoire).

Abstract:

Antimicrobial effects of various Capsicum varieties have been attributed to several molecules including capsaicin, m-coumaric acid and trans-cinnamic acid. Lecithin however has been overlooked as a potential bacterial growth inhibitor either alone or in combination with hydrophobic molecules such as capsaicin. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the presence of lecithin, capsaicin, m-coumaric acid and trans-cinnamic acid in three pepper varieties and to evaluate the antibacterial effects of pepper extracts and synthetic molecules (alone and in combination) on six food borne pathogenic bacteria. The presence of proposed antimicrobial molecules was evaluated by thin layer chromatography. The direct drop plate method was used to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of the three pepper extracts (Bell Pepper, Capsicum anuum; Jalapeno, Capsicum annuum; Habanero, Capsicum chinense) and synthetic and/or extracted molecules (trans-cinnamic acid, m-coumaric acid, capsaicin and lecithin). The six pathogenic bacteria used were Bacillus cereus ATCC 56926, Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Listeria monocytogenes HPB#43, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Salmonella typhimurium. Lecithin was found in all three pepper varieties, while capsaicin was present in only Jalapeno and Habanero. Trans-cinnamic acid and m-coumaric acid were present in Bell pepper and Jalapeno pepper only. The extract of Bell pepper had antibacterial effects on all six bacteria tested. L. monocytogenes resisted Jalapeno and Habanero extracts while B. cereus resisted the Habanero extract only. Lecithin (synthetic and extracted), trans-cinnamic acid (synthetic) and m-coumaric acid all inhibited growth of the six bacteria tested. Capsaicin did not have any antibacterial effects, alone or in combination with lecithin. Antibacterial effects of peppers could not be attributed to capsaicin, trans-cinnamic acid or m-coumaric acid since pepper extracts lacking these molecules were antibacterial. This study proposes that lecithin is responsible for the antibacterial effects demonstrated in this study.

Megan H. Hargreaves

Queensland University of Technology
Australia

Title: Pentose sugars as a fermentation substrate: From waste to plate

Time : 12:05-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Megan H. Hargreaves graduated from the University of Queensland in 1974 with first class honors in a Bachelor of Science degree, majoring in microbiology. She immediately embarked on an Academic career with special interest in the teaching of Science, both full time and part time for some years. Her specialist teaching area was that of Infection Control in the Health Professions such as Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy. She joined the Queensland University of Technology in 1993 and adopted the QUT corporate identity as a “University for the Real World” in both her teaching and research interests. She undertook doctoral studies in Higher Education, gaining a Ph.D. in 2000. Since 2000, she has expanded her research interests to include a strong focus based on her earlier interest in infection control, now directed towards environmental microbiology and food quality control. The latter has appropriately included an interest in food manufacturing and fermentation technology. Her publications have covered the gamut of these areas, and include a continuing interest in teaching quality. These publications demonstrate a focus on quality control, with special interest in the Microbiological aspects of QC. Further, previously unpublished work includes cutting edge studies on production of food additives using previously unrecognized micro-organisms isolated from the environment. Outside of the Academic arena, she continues to act as a senior Technical Assessor for NATA (the National Association of Testing Authorities) in Australia, with specialty areas of focus in food and water quality.

Abstract:

Lignocellulosic materials, such as sugar cane bagasse, a waste product of the sugarcane processing industry, agricultural residues and herbaceous crops, may serve as an abundant and comparatively cheap feedstock for large-scale industrial fermentation, resulting in the production of marketable end-products. However, the complex structure of lignocellulosic materials, the presence of various hexose and pentose sugars in the hemicellulose component, and the presence of various compounds that inhibit the organisms selected for the fermentation process, all constitute barriers that add to the production costs and make full scale industrial production economically less feasible. Our study was conducted in order to screen naturally occurring microorganisms for their ability to utilize pentose sugars such as those present in sugar mill industrial waste. A large number of individual bacterial strains were screened from hemi-cellulose rich material collected at the Proserpine and Maryborough sugar mills (Queensland, Australia), notably soil samples from the mill sites. Several strains of bacteria from the actinomycetes group were found to be pentose-capable. Pentose degrading microbes are very rare in the environment, so this was a significant discovery. Previous research indicated that microbes could degrade pentose after genetic modification but the microbes discovered in this research were able to naturally utilize pentose. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), it was found that all of the organisms produced arginine and cysteine after utilization of the pentose substrates alone. In addition, one strain produced alanine and glycine.

Hasan Cebi

Manisa City Directory of Food, Agriculture & Livestock
Turkey

Title: Food, agriculture and livestock productivity in Manisa, Turkey: The profile study

Time : 12:25-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Hasan Cebi was born in Samsun in 1963. He completed all schools in Samsun and he graduated the zootechnics department of Ondokuz Mayıs University in the same city. Also he completed the Faculty of Economics in Anadolu University. He completed the zootechnics master’s degree in Ondokuz Mayıs University. He worked as an agricultural engineer in Provincial Directorate of Agriculture, Karadeniz Agricultural Research Institute and the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Strategy Development Department of Turkey during 1981-1997. He had administration positions in several places including Karadeniz Agricultural Research Institute Director (1997), Provincial Directorate of Agriculture in Aydın (2004), in Kırıkkale (2005), in Mardin (2008), again in Kırıkkale (2010). He was appointed as Senior Advisor in Food, Agriculture and Livestock Ministery in Ankara (2011), at the same time, he continued the Provincial Directorate of Agriculture in Kırklareli (2011). Since 2012 July, he has been acting as the Food, Agriculture and Livestock Director in Manisa, Turkey.

Abstract:

Manisa is one of the major agricultural production areas owing to its favorable climate, rich soil, high quality in water and also its unique geographical potential. In 5.139.374 acres of agricultural land located in Manisa, various agricultural products are produced above average yields, compared to Turkey scale. 43.8 percent of agricultural areas are being watered so, it has crop varieties including fruit and vegetables. Sultana grape, olive, cherry, tobacco and vegetables with premium and highly productive are mostly produced in this area. Comparing to total production in Turkey, %30 of total grapes, %94 of sultana raisin, %33 of tobacco,%12 of table olive, %7 of corn, cherry and tomato are being produced in Manisa. Whereas many part of agricultural products are exported. Livestock is also foremost position in Manisa. It has known that poultry sector is one the major group of livestock, has being developed, increasingly. %12 of poultry and egg production actualizes in Manisa. Within this context, the most important organized industrial place located in Manisa has a developed industry.

Speaker
Biography:

Indika Edirisinghe Ph.D. is an assistant professor at IIT and senior scientist at center for nutrition Science institute for food safety and health. He has 15 years experiences in the area of nutritional science, biochemistry and molecular biology. He is an expert in the design and conduct of human clinical studies relevant to bioavailability and investigating markers of biological activity, specifically alterations to metabolic- oxidative and immune- homeostasis. He has published nearly 30 papers related to oxidative stress, endothelial function and insulin resistance.

Abstract:

Insulin resistance (IR) is a critical metabolic abnormality requiring attention. In addition to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), its roots are found in cardiovascular diseases, stroke, Alzheimer disease and longevity. The association of obesity with T2D has been recognized for decades, and the major basis for this link is the ability of obesity to engender IR. The growing obesity epidemic in the United States continues to escalate the number of individuals at risk for developing IR. In the United States, an estimated ~78 million individuals are affected by IR. Both genetic and environmental factors are involved; however, only 5–10% of patients exhibit specific genetic mutations responsible for IR. Therefore, an outstanding percentage is due to environmental factors, many of which are modifiable, such as the diet. Although the exact mechanisms of IR have not been described fully, cellular events sensitive to oxidative stress and inflammation have been described and suggested as causative factors of IR. Fruits and vegetables, and particularly those with higher polyphenolic content are suggested to have favorable effects on human health due to their ability to modulate oxidative and/or inflammatory stress in peripheral and central tissues. Therefore, this presentation will be focus on the studies that has demonstrated the effects of polyphenolic compounds on oxidative- inflammatory- stress and further, the relationship of these responses to insulin action in humans.

Alison Burton Shepherd

King’s College London
United Kingdom

Title: Can we really trust genetically modified foods?

Time : 13:05-13:25

Speaker
Biography:

Alison Burton Shepherd is a queen’s nurse and tutor in nursing at Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery Kings College London. She has over 80 publications which have been peer reviewed. She is also a registered nutritionist and is on the Editorial Board of the Journal for Food and Nutritional Disorders (USA) and is a regular contributor to Network Health Dieticians. She still works in a clinical capacity as a nurse advisor for a private out of Hours Company where she works autonomously from home.

Abstract:

Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. The introduction of genetically modified (GM) products to the food market resulted in them becoming a controversial topic, with their proponents and contestants. GM foods are useful in controlling the occurrence of certain diseases and furthermore there is a growing body of research which has identified that GM food is reported to be high in nutrients and overall suggest that GM foods contain more minerals and vitamins than those found in traditionally grown foods. Moreover GM foods are known to taste better. Another reason for people opting for GM foods is that they have an increased shelf life and hence there is less fear of foods getting spoiled quickly, which is an important issue for those who are impoverished. However in contrast, it is believed that consumption of these genetically engineered foods can cause the development of diseases which are immune to antibiotics. More importantly, despite ever advancing technology in this field, as these foods are new inventions, not much is known about their long term effects on human beings. This presentation aims to review the potential benefits and risks resulting from the consumption of transgenic food in order to help health professionals and the public to decide if it is indeed safe to consume GM foods.

Break: Lunch Break 13:25-14:10 @ Coral B

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University
Turkey

Title: The less oil uptake strategies in deep fat Frying

Time : 14:10-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Ozlem Tokusoglu has completed her Ph.D. at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Department of Food Engineering at 2001. She is currently working as Associate Professor in Celal Bayar University Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. She performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as visiting professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, and Pullman, Washington, USA during April-May 2010. She organized and directed as Conference Chair the International Congress entitled ANPFT2012 (Advanced Non-thermal Processing in Food Technology: Effects on Quality and Shelf-Life of Food and Beverages in May, 2012 at Turkey. She served as organizing committee member at 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Nutritional Science & Therapy Conference in July 2013 at Philadelphia, USA. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of International Journal of Food Science and Technology (IJFST) by Wiley Publisher, USA and Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment (JFAE) by WFL Publisher, Finland. She published the scientific edited two book entitled Fruit and Cereal Bio-actives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, USA Publisher and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders is in progress.

Abstract:

Due to their unique, delicious flavor and sensory characteristics, fried foods remain very popular world-wide; frying is effective way to cook and rapid preparation. The reduction of the fat content in fried food is desirable, mainly owing to its relationship with obesity and coronary diseases. Frying is the cause of much fat absorption into food. Fats can reach much higher temperatures than water at normal atmospheric pressure. Through frying, one can sear or even carbonize the surface of foods while caramelizing sugars. The oil uptake increase with increasing removal of water from the food during frying. However, slimness trend and acrylamide scare, the market of fried products is still developing. There has been great interest to control fat uptake in food processing, based upon pre and post frying treatments, modifications of the frying method, and edible barrier techniques. One such strategy is in the replacement of fatty ingredients with possible alternatives that can duplicate the functionality of traditional ingredients without loss of other properties. As replacement ingredients, starches, proteins, celluloses, emulsifiers and antioxidant aids are now widely available and are incorporated into many commercial frying oils. For frying quality, food type (composition and nature of food, fried food quantity (kg/h), continuous OR intermittent frying); fryer quality (capacity and surface fryer temperature, heat transfer mode, metal type in contact with fat); oil type (nature thermo stability, fresh oil addition); other applications (protective gas, antifoams additives, antioxidants additives, emulsifier additives and using filter aids) can be effective. It is stated that the optimization of frying by alteration of frying temperature, substitution by healthy oils, filtration of using oils and adsorbent treatments, new frying oils with various additives, give healthier fatty acid profiles and higher heat stability to frying oils.
The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of innovative fortification system consist of selected adsorbent, emulsifiers, antifoam and selected antioxidants on some frying characteristics and less oil uptake of fried foods. The special sunflower oil was used for deep fat frying and innovative frying oils were fortified with emulsifiers, anti-polymerizing agents, with natural and synthetic antioxidants; selected foods were fried at 180 C for 6 min in control sunflower oil and in new developed CBUFry1, CBUFry2, CBUFry3 frying oils. The overall quality, the physicochemical properties, [moisture, oil content, total polar compounds, fatty acids (FAs), color analyses], the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) analyses, sensory properties of fortified deep fat frying oils and deep fried foods including potato, eggplant-pepper, sardines, coating crisped chicken meat and also rolls (phyllo dough) with cheese filling were performed.
The innovative CBUFry1, CBUFry2, CBUFry3 formulations improved the fried food quality. The reduction of oil content accomplished as about 55wt% with three formulations (p≤ 0.05) and total polar compounds level decreased above 72% (p≤ 0.05). Color L and b values increased at the fried potato slices and eggplant. These ascorbic acid (AA) levels were higher than that of normal frying. It was concluded that our innovation formulation provided the additional intake of monounsaturated fat (MUFA). The best results for less oil uptake were in deep fat fried potato > rolls (phyllo dough) > eggplant-pepper > sardine > coated chicken meat, respectively. It was concluded that this proposed innovative fortification system can be used for frying oils and can be adaptable to industrial frying oil technology.

Alvin Lee

Illinois Institute of Technology
USA

Title: Non-thermal processing technologies to inactivate foodborne viruses

Time : 14:30-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Alvin Lee was a Center Director and Associate Professor of Food Science and Nutrition and he is a microbiologist and virologist with more than 15 years research experience with a PhD from RMIT University, Australia in Biotechnology and Applied Biology. He currently leads IFSH Center for Processing Innovation and co-leads the joint IFSH/FDA Microbiology Research Platform on food safety and defense related projects. He also manages the IFSH BSL-3 laboratory and pilot plant. Current research support includes funding from USDA, US FDA, National Center for Food Protection and Defense (NCFPD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and various industry contracts. He is an instructor for food microbiology in the IIT’s Masters of Science program and has mentored more than 25 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. He is currently an active member of the International Association for Food Protection – serving on the IAFP Scientific Program Committee, American Society for Microbiology and Institute of Food Technologists – serving on the Annual Scientific Meeting Program Advisory Panel.

Abstract:

According to the United States Centers for disease control and prevention, human enteric viruses are estimated to cause two-thirds of the foodborne illness in the U.S. each year, with the majority attributed to norovirus (NoV). Enteric viruses including NoV, hepatitis A and E viruses can enter the food supply through contaminated environmental factors or by contamination during handling and processing, resulting in outbreaks ranging from small isolated ones to epidemic. A number of innovative food processing technologies have been used to mitigate the risk viruses pose to our food supply. The effects of food processing technologies such as high pressure processing can result in more than 3.5-log10 TCID50 ml-1 reduction of hepatitis A virus and feline calicivirus for shellfish application while pulsed light can inactivate 4.5-log10 PFU ml-1 of MNV-1 within 10 s. The presentation will focus on inactivation strategies currently examined by NoroCORE, a USDA-NIFA Food Virology Collaborative funded by USDA, include high pressure processing, high power ultrasound and pulsed light applications. Such strategies could be incorporated into a quantitative risk assessment model which may be used to determine the risk management strategies that will determine appropriate process criteria on reducing the contamination of foods such as shellfish, fresh produce and RTE foods.

Speaker
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly experienced, principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors, biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bio-conversion, and analytical biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new start up biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Sugars alcohol (Polyols), are currently used as a bulk sweetener in reduced calorie foods. It has been part of the human diet for thousand of years as it is present in fruits such as pears, melons and grapes, as well as foods such as mushrooms and fermentation –derived foods (wine, soy sauce and cheese). Sugars alcohol is believed to be good sugar substitute for people with diabetes plus they do not contribute to dental caries (cavities). The most common sugars alcohol available in the market is sorbitol, mannitol, xyletol and erythretol. Manufacturing, benefits and applications in food and drinks for these common sugars alcohol and others will be presented.

Break: Lunch Break 13:35-14:20
Speaker
Biography:

Yousef S. Alsaadi is a Certified Food Scientist (CFS) and a Food Science Ph.D. Candidate at Food Science Institute, Kansas State University, in Manhattan Kansas. He is Head of Special Microbiology Unit at Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority in United Arab Emirates. His major research interest is in rapid methods and automation in food microbiology and food safety areas.

Abstract:

In the food industry, coliform testing is used by time consuming and a labor intensive plate count method or tube enumeration methods. The TEMPO system (bioMerieux) was developed to improve laboratory efficiency and to replace traditional methods. It uses a miniaturization of the Most Probable Number (MPN) method with a ingenius 16 tubes with 3 dilution in one single disposable card. It utilizes two stations: TEMPO Preparation station and TEMPO Reading station. In this study, Oxyrase (Oxyrase, Inc.) enzyme was added to TEMPO TC (Total Coliforms) method. Water samples of 1 ml with 0.1 ml of Oxyrase enzyme were compared with samples without Oxyrase enzyme using TEMPO system. Samples were spiked with different levels of coliforms (10, 102, 103 and 104 CFU/ml), stomached (20 sec), and pipetted into the TEMPO TC media reagent (4 ml) in duplicate then automatically transferred into the TEMPO TC card by the TEMPO Preparation station. Coliforms counts were obtained using TEMPO Reading station every 6 hours for 24-hour incubation period at 35°C. Results from 15 replicates of samples were compared statistically. Regression analysis of log counts demonstrates that TEMPO TC with Oxyrase enzyme gives results in 12±3 hours compared to TEMPO TC without Oxyrase enzyme gives results in 24 hours. The Oxyrase enzyme with TEMPO method for total coliforms enumeration is a valuable rapid method.

Ma. Cristina B. Gragasin

Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization
Philippines

Title: Utilization of mango peels as source of pectin

Time : 15:30-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Ma. Cristina B. Gragasin is a Supervising Science Research Specialist at the Philippine Center for Postharvest and Mechanization, a research agency under the Department of Agriculture in the Philippines. She has 29 years of work experience in research and development on postharvest technologies to preserve the quality and safety of food products. She finished her doctorate degree at Chiba University in Japan specializing on pesticide toxicology. As researcher, she has worked on aflatoxin contamination in peanuts, kinetics of decay of pesticides used in the tropics, integrated use of insecticides to preserve the quality of stored grain, screening and evaluation of botanical plants for pesticidal activity, utilization of mango peels as source of pectin, enhancing the quality and safety of moringa products, etc. She has received various awards as a researcher, published several papers in scientific journals and attended international conferences to present the output of her research undertakings.

Abstract:

The potential of carabao mango (Mangifera indica) peels as source of pectin was investigated in line with the Philippines’ total dependence on imported pectin. This research successfully established an extraction process that produced pectin from carabao mango peels which conformed to United States Pharmacopeia (USP) standard. Results showed that dried carabao mango peels yielded 21.65% pharmaceutical grade pectin. The product was characterized as high methoxyl pectin because of its high galacturonic acid content (92.82% - 98.65%). It is applicable for food formulation because of its high degree of esterification (76-79). The total dietary fiber and sugar contents were 77.4% and 4.8%, respectively, indicating usefulness for better digestive functions. Its gelling properties were comparable with the analytical grade pectin. The produced pectin was also free from chemical and microbial contaminants. Cost analysis revealed that the production cost for pectin from mango peels under laboratory scale amounting to Php5,667.51/kg was cheaper than the average landed cost of imported pectin (Php27,122.56/kg). Hence, local production of pectin from mango peels has great potential. It will create business and job opportunities, help in saving the country’s dollar reserves through less or non-importation of pectin, and in saving the environment from depletion through solid wastes utilization.

Speaker
Biography:

Sameer Khalil Ghawi is a post-doctoral researcher at the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading, White knights, UK.

Abstract:

Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring cancer chemo preventive, is the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, the main glucosinolate in broccoli. The hydrolysis requires myrosinase isoenzyme to be present in an active state; however, cooking leads to its denaturation. In order to ensure glucoraphanin hydrolysis, broccoli must either be mildly cooked or active sources of myrosinase can be added post-cooking.
In this study, mustard seeds as exogenous source of myrosinase were added to cooked broccoli as a condiment with a view to intensify the formation of sulforaphane. Thermal inactivation of myrosinases from broccoli and mustard seeds was studied. Thermal degradation of broccoli glucoraphanin was also investigated. In addition, the effect of mustard seeds addition on sensory profiling and consumer acceptability was assessed.
Mustard seed myrosinase showed higher thermal stability than broccoli myrosinase. Limited thermal degradation of glucoraphanin (about 10%) was observed when broccoli was sous vide cooked in a water bath at 100 °C for either 8 or 12 min. Addition of mustard seed powder to cooked broccoli reinitiated the formation of sulforaphane.
Broccoli that had been mildy cooked was not acceptable to consumers. Addition of mustard seed powder significantly changed sensory attributes of broccoli samples and affected consumer liking. Despite the significant increase in pungency and burning sensation in samples with added mustard seeds, a considerable number of consumers (32%) liked it. This suggests that optimized addition of Brassica condiments (e.g. mustard seeds, rocket, horseradish, watercress) to cooked broccoli may be a route to enhance bioactivity of cooked broccoli without compromising consumer acceptability.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahsen Ezel Bildik completed her bachelor, master and Ph.D. studies at Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Engineering Department (Istanbul). She is currently working as researcher in Istanbul University. She is expert on packaging quality and quantity. Her specific study areas on nutraceutical additives of paper making and packaging, paper surface coating applications with antimicrobial materials and corrugated board strength properties evaluation.

Abstract:

Paper has hygroscopic structure. So that this material is weak against steam, water vapor, and liquids. Packaging materials coated with coating color which has strong barrier properties gain resistance against liquids. At the same time, paper density increases because of the gaps in the paper are filled. Paper packaging materials coated with synthetic polymers are not biodegradable and environmentally friendly. So that, scientists are in quest of using natural polymers as coating agents. Curcuma (zerdeçal) and lawsonia (kına) materials used in this study are preferred because of their antioxidant and antibacterial features beside their natural biopolymers. These materials are also biocompatible, environmentally friendly and recyclable. They are suitable materials for coating because of their water-insoluble structure. It was obtained the turmeric paper and henna coated papers. These two samples were made; first one was 10% (w / w) of curcuma, the other one was 10% (w / w) lawsonia and 30% (w / w) starch used as binder for both samples. Distilled water used in all processes. Paper surface was coated with prepared coating color using # 0 bar by hand drawn. The amount of coating on one side was applied as a maximum of 4.5 g/m2. In this study, packaging papers which are direct contact with food were chosen. Best results were obtained in snack chips box and sulfite paper. Physical strength tests were made in addition to antimicrobial activity tests to understand how all these process affected the papers strength properties. According to the results of this study, all coating operations increased burst index in reference to uncoated papers. Coating sulfite papers with curcuma increased the index %56,2 while coating sulfite papers with Lawsonia increased %55,5. Coating boxes with curcuma increased the index %9, 1 while coating boxes with lawsonia increased %2, 5. Elastic modulus, tear index value of all samples decreased and breaking length, elongation, and tensile index values increased.

Break: Coffee Break 16:10-16:25 @ Foyer
  • Track 9: Industrial Application of Food Technology
    Track 10: Nutritional Deficiencies and Nutraceuticals
    Track 12: Instrumentation in Food Technology
Location: Tahit
Speaker

Chair

John Tsaknis

Technological Educational Institution of Athens
Greece

Speaker

Co-Chair

Claus Muss

International Research Group of Applied Preventive Medicine
Austria

Session Introduction

Harun Rasit Uysal

Ege University
Turkey

Title: European and Turkish dairy sector: Traditional dairy products at a glance

Time : 14:10-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Harun Uysal, after graduating in faculty of agriculture, department of food science and technology from the Ege University, Izmir, Turkey in 1984, he completed his Master of Science in 1987 and doctorate in 1993 at faculty of agriculture, department of dairy technology. His specific interests on probiotic dairy products, traditional dairy products, functional and organic dairy products, biochemical aspects of cheese ripening, waste treatment in dairy technology, biochemical aspects of fermented dairy products, food safety and management systems sensory evaluation and quality control assessments on milk and dairy products. He is currently working at faculty of agriculture, department of dairy technology, Ege University, Izmir and he is director of Ege University Tire Vocational School. His membership includes the chamber of agriculture Engineers, union of chambers of Turkish Engineers and Architects, organization of organic agriculture of Turkey. He has authored about 150 publications on milk and dairy product technologies and qualities. He is currently in committee of agriculture and agri-based industry of Aegean Region chamber of industry, in committee of food quality and safety of Aegean Region chamber of industry and also Turkish Milk Board which is the member of International Dairy Federation. He is also television programmer on “Agriculture and Food” program in Ege University Television.

Abstract:

Dairy is the ones of the developing sectors in Turkey. For example; three years ago, while the production of raw milk was 12 million tons. Today it increased 17 million tons. The export of dairy products moved up 300 million dollars in 2013 also. In this case Turkish dairy sector grips European countries and other Middle East countries. Turkish dairy sector is member of International Dairy Federation (IDF) and will organize IDF summit in 2017. There are a lot of Turkish traditional dairy products but they aren't well-known in the world. Some of them are very tasty. For example; white cheese, precipitated cheese, tongue cheese, mesh cheese, skin cheese, wire cheese etc. I believe that these products are culture inheritance of humaneness. Therefor there are known by other countries. These meetings will be good to promote them to participants and sector agents who will come from different countries.

Speaker
Biography:

John Tsaknis has completed his Ph.D. and Postdoctoral studies from Lincolnshire University, School of Food Sciences and is a chartered chemist from the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. He is full professor in the School of Food Technology and Nutrition in Athens Greece. He is a member of the Standing Committee “Residues and Chemical Contaminants” in the International Dairy Federation (IDF) and Reviewer of 7 international scientific journals. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and participated in more than 30 international conferences and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Chios mastic gum, the resin obtained as an exudate from the trunk and branches of Pistacia lentiscus L var. chia, has found extensive use as a nutritional supplement. The oral absorption of crude resin (containing a high percentage of an insoluble polymer of poly-β-myrcene) is poor due to its low water-solubility and reduces the bioavailability of the contained active compounds. A total mastic extract without polymer (TMEWP) was prepared after removal of the contained insoluble polymer in order to ameliorate solubility and enhance in vivo activity. To further characterize potential active mastic constituents, the TMEWP was separated into an acidic (AMGE) and a neutral fraction (NMGE). To overcome the drawbacks of fractions, the selection of a suitable carrier is necessary and crucial. Three different methods used for the preparation of lipid-based colloidal carriers consisting of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. For the determination of the antioxidant activity two methods Rancimat and Differential Scanning Calorimeter were applied: Moreover, the crude extract (TMEWP) of mastic, as well as, their AMGE and NMGE were assayed, before and after their encapsulation against a panel of 11 human and food pathogenic gram (+) bacteria and fungi. The results showed that the encapsulated fractions of mastic gum presented higher antioxidant activity in comparison to the pure fractions. The obtained result of antimicrobial activity is showing a very interesting profile.

Claus Muss

International Research Group of Applied Preventive Medicine
Austria

Title: Stool parameters improving evidence in clinical research for food intestinal malabsorption of micronutrients

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Claus Muss has completed his doctorates in Medical School Munich and Veterinary School Berlin and his Ph.D. in Public Health Science at St. Elisabeth University Bratislava (SK) where after habilitation he was appointed as Associate Professor. Besides his clinical activities in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, he is head of the world wide networking International Research Group of Applied Preventive Medicine, Coauthor of 7 scientific journals with over 87 own publications.

Abstract:

Malabsorption is a failure to fully absorb nutrients from the gastrointestinal tract. There are many causes including abnormalities of the gut wall, failure to produce digestive enzymes and abnormalities of gut flora as well as food intolerances contributing to intestinal malabsorption. Malabsorption may eventually lead to micronutrient deficiency, without any clinical symptoms at first sign. The outcome of numerous clinical studies does not consider malabsorption and assume that the oral intake of micronutrients coincides fully with the supply. Under such conditions epidemiological studies concerning the supply of micronutrients lack correct data as in major cases they are not based on blood levels surveys. For clinical surveys of malabsorption we propose to include parameters from stool samples to investigate transmissibility and subclinical inflammation in the intestine. Alpha-1 - Antitrypsin, Zonulin and other parameters have been validated sensitivity and have been used in larger cohorts. By including these parameters malabsorption can be excluded effectively in clinical nutritional research. Results of clinical validation of such parameters will be presented. As a conclusion we suggest to include stool parameters for the analysis of food malabsorption, when studying the effects of micronutrient supplementation to avoid subclinical deficiencies in the outcome of study analysis.

Gamal A. El-Sharnouby

King Faisal University
Saudi Arabia

Title: Conversion of processed citrus wastes into nutritional components

Time : 15:10-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Gamal A. El-Sharnouby has completed his Ph.D. from Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. He is the professor of food science and nutrition. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute. He is member in many professional societies. He has attended more than 20 national and international conferences and scientific symposia. He has supervised many of the Masters and Ph.D. students. He has worked as a scientific consultant for many food factories. He has participated in the development of many of the food standards. He has experience in food science and technology, functional food, natural pigments, food safety, fruits processing, determine the expire date of food for human consumption. He is a principle investigator in many food science and technology projects.

Abstract:

Food processing wastes may impose heavy burden on factories and cause enormous environmental problems. Citrus wastes typically are about 45-50 % of the weight of citrus original and the percentage of waste to 30-50% for vegetables and fruits in general. Natural color plays a significant role in determining the degree of consumer acceptance of the product. In addition, carotenoids (vitamin A precursor) have high nutritional values which are important for human nutrition. The efficiency of different organic solvents such as acetone 85%, hexane, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and ethanol 90% in the extraction of pigments from citrus peel was studied. Ethyl acetate is the best solvent in extracting carotenoids from citrus peel, followed by ethanol 90%.. HPLC was used to identify the extracted pigments and their components. The extracted natural pigments were mixed with different carriers such as starch, lactose, dextrin, Arabic gum, and it was noted that lactose is the best one, followed by starch compared with different tested carriers. We also found that Alpha-tocopherol was relatively more stable than butylated hydroxy toluene (BHT) antioxidant (an artificial compound). Natural extracted pigments were used in food product (e.g. jelly) evaluations and gave the better values for the color, flavor and taste compared to commercial samples with artificial additives.

Speaker
Biography:

Mojisola Adenike Oyarekua, Ph.D. is a senior lecturer and present department Head of Microbiology in Federal university, Nigeria. Her research specialization is based on fermentation process of under- utilized cereals, legumes tubers and vegetables to produce infant complementary food for low socio-economic mothers in Nigeria. She has enjoyed the following fellowships: University of Ibadan/ National Institute of Health Students Fellowship U.S.A (6months). University of Ibadan/ International Research and Development Centre, Montpellier, France, (6months). She has published 21 papers national and international reputable journals. She has attended international conferences including CIGR Conference Nantes France in 2011.

Abstract:

This study assessed the effect of sodium citrate and black pepper (Piper guineense) on chemical, microbial and sensory characteristics of smoked catfish slices during six 6-week storage at ambient temperature. The fresh catfish were processed, soaked in the warm (45±10C) spice extracts for 10 minutes, drained and smoke-dried. It was thereafter subjected to the following treatments: 1% Sodium citrate (B) 1%Black pepper (C) 1% Sodium citrate + 1% Black pepper (D) while the control (A) sample was smoke-dried without soaking in any solution. The samples were analyzed using standard methods. Results of the proximate analysis of sample after 6 weeks storage showed the following; moisture content ranged from 10.12 - 19.42% at day 0 and 13.54 - 17.87% ; protein content ranged from 60.52 to 69.30% and 63.66 - 69.13% ; fat content ranged from 14.24 to 16.66% and 12.05 - 15.00%; ash content ranged from 3.42 to 5.48% and 3.71 - 5.95%. There was significant (p > 0.05) reduction in the Peroxide Value (PV) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values in comparison with the control. The samples total plate count ranged from 3.24 to 3.88 log10 Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g at day zero and increased to 6.24 log10 CFU/g. The result of general acceptability, however, shows that sample D was most acceptable. Using sodium citrate and black pepper singly and in combination have a potent antioxidant and antimicrobial effect more than smoking.

Speaker
Biography:

Gordana Surlan-Momirovic has completed her PhD at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Agriculture-Biotechnology and Postdoctoral studies from University of Missouri, Columbia and Faculty of Biology. She is Professor of Genetics and Head of Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding at the University of Belgrade Faculty of Agriculture, Serbia. She has published more than 180 papers in reputed journals and is Vice-president of Fulbright Alumni Association.

Abstract:

The tested accessions consisted of 15 genotypes of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. ssp. vulgare) and 15 genotypes of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.). Trials were sown at the three locations in Serbia during two consecutuve vegetation seasons. The following agronomic traits were measured: grain yield, thousand grain weight, plant height, spike length, number of grains per spike, grain length, grain width, grain thickness, coefficient of the productive tillering. Measured chemical technological traits were: phytic acid; inorganic phosphorus (Pi), β-carotene, total phenols, free protein sulfhydryl groups (PSH), soluble proteins, grain vitreousness. The objectives of this study were to: unravel the relationship between measured traits (breeding objectives); identify positively or negatively correlated traits, indicate the possibility of indirect selection for the trait of interest; visualize genotype traits profiles (strengths and weaknesses of a genotype), which is important for the proper selection of parents and comparison of selection strategies. Genotype by trait biplot (GT) analysis revealed existance of positive association between phenols and β-carotene (bread and durum wheat), phytic acid and PSH (bread wheat); phenols and PSH (durum wheat). Negative association was between phytic acid and β-carotene, and with phenols (bread wheat), and also with all examined antioxidants (durum wheat). β-carotene and PSH were negatively associated for bread wheat and positively for durum wheat. Relation between PSH and phenols was more vague, and positive relationship existed in three environments, and negative in three, for bread wheat. Grain vitreousness was negatively associated with all examined antioxidants and positively with phytic acid (durum wheat).

Break: Coffee Break 16:10-16:25 @ Foyer
  • Young Research Forum
Location: Tahiti

Session Introduction

Manuel Krewinkel

University of Hohenheim
Germany

Title: Utilization of cellobiose 2-epimerases for epilactose production in milk

Time : 16:25-16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Manuel Krewinkel graduated from RWTH Aachen University in 2011 with a master degree in biology, specialized in biotechnology. Thereafter he started his Ph.D. studies at the University of Hohenheim, Germany where he currently works for the department of biotechnology. His work is focused on food associated enzyme technology. In this field he has major expertise on identification, acquisition and application of isomerases and hydrolases in milk systems.

Abstract:

It was reported recently that enzymes belonging to the emerging class of cellobiose 2-epimerases (CE) from various aerobic microorganisms converted lactose into epilactose in defined buffer systems. Lactose (4-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-glucose) is a main component of cow milk, with an average content of about 4.5 % (w/v). Apart from this main sugar also traces of lactulose (4-O-β-D-galactosyl-D-fructose) and epilactose (4-O-β-D-galactosyl-D-mannose) can be found in UHT treated milk. These sugars are formed by isomerisation and epimerization during the heating process. Both lactulose and epilactose seem to possess prebiotic properties. Therefore, enzymatic in situ production of these sugars may introduce an added value for dairy products. We showed that CE from two mesophilic microorganisms, Flavobacterium johnsoniae DSM 2064 and Pedobacter heparinus DSM 2366, were capable of converting lactose into prebiotic epilactose in a complex milk system.
The bioconversions of milk lactose were carried out at an industrially relevant low temperature of 8°C in order to avoid undesired microbial contaminations or chemical side reactions. Both enzymes were reasonably active at this low temperature, due to their origin from mesophilic organisms. A conversion yield of about 30 to 33 % epilactose was achieved with both enzymes. No side products apart from epilactose were detected.
After successfully showing the direct conversion of milk lactose at reaction parameters typically used for milk processing in the dairy industry, the development of further processes, such as using whey, seem conceivable. Thus, the utilization of CE in the dairy industry opens up new perspectives for the generation of products with potential prebiotic properties.

Debolina Ghosh

Hathaway Brown School
USA

Title: Does bitter melon (Momordica charantia) have antibacterial property?

Time : 16:40-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Debolina Ghosh is a student of the prestigious Hathaway Brown High School in Shaker Heights, Ohio, recipient of the best middle school student award, member of the Honor Council, and an active participant in her school’s speech and debate team. She participates in the Science, Research, and Engineering Program (SREP) at school. A finalist in the state level competition of the National Geographic Bee, she is also a graduate of Indian classical dance (Bharatanatyam); she has received many awards at regional and state level competitions. She also enjoys singing Indian classical music and takes part in her school’s chair.

Abstract:

Introduction: The basic research studied whether the Mormodica charantia more commonly known as the bitter melon had any antibacterial property like it was claimed to have. The study conclusions can help those in the alternate medicine/nutrition fields to either eliminate or enforce their beliefs in the medicinal values of the bitter melon as antibiotic. It was hypothesized that the bitter melon known for having many supposed health benefits would kill or inhibit the growth of both Gram positive and negative bacteria. This study was undertaken to prove or disprove the above hypothesis so that herbal and alternative medicine could use this information to purify the compound of interest in bitter melon and use as antibiotic.
Material and Methods: The bitter melon was divided into three parts, interior, middle, and exterior skin, which were then formed into liquid extracts. Unprepared disks were then soaked in these solutions and put on petri dishes with Staphylococcus aureus already growing on them. Similar procedures were followed with the control untreated disk and distilled water soaked disc groups. The ready-made penicillin and erythromycin disks were directly put in the petri dishes from their dispensers as active control.
Results: After 24 hours of incubation the dishes were observed. These petri dishes with dishes with penicillin and erythromycin disks showed clear zones of inhibition around the disks whereas the background was golden yellow. These dishes with penicillin and erythromycin had averages of 11.6mm and 9mm thick zones of inhibition respectively. Whereas those petri dishes with the control unprepared disk, distilled water, and all bitter melon extract containing petri dishes had no significant clear zones of inhibition around the disks. Additionally there was no change in the color of the liquid media containing the bacteria after treatment with bitter melon extract.
Discussion/Conclusions: The bitter melon was therefore proven not to have an antibacterial property, going against the common belief. Though this study drew a negative conclusion, but the inference drawn has significant implication in the field of nutrition and alternative or herbal medicine. It is however, important to acknowledge that though the hypothesis was not supported in this study, bitter melon still may have health benefits other than as antibacterial agent.

Speaker
Biography:

Solomon Mengistu Lemma has M.Sc. in Food Engineering. He is working to obtain his Ph.D. studies in Food Nanotechnology at the Free University of Bozen, Bolzano, Italy by the end of 2014. He has conducted research studies on micro and nano-sensors in Denmark Technical University and nano-encapsulation of bioactives in Swinburne University of Technology, Australia to fulfil his Ph.D. work. He has research and teaching experiences in food processing and engineering in Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia and Free University of Bozen, Bolzano, Italy since 2008. He has published three papers in reputed journals and one book related to foodtech

Abstract:

Retinyl acetate (RA) was effectively incorporated into nano-fibers of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at 10% (w/w) of PVA in order to develop encapsulating for prolong shelf-life and thermal stability assisting by β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex (β-CD-IC). The nanofibers were produced via electro spinning technique from aqueous mixture of PVA/ retinyl acetate and PVA/retinyl acetate/ β-CD. The rheological behavior and conductivity of the solutions were analyzed to investigate variations prior to electrospinning. The physical and thermal properties of encapsulated retinyl acetate were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The nanofibers of PVA/retinyl acetate and PVA/retinyl acetate/ β - CD exhibited a bead free average fiber diameters 264±61nm and 223±49 nm, respectively. The surface chemistry of the functional nano-fibers webs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) demonstrated a different thermal stability between the bioactive and the polymer with and without β -CD. Square-wave voltammogram peak current change was used to follow the release kinetics of retinyl acetate from the nanofibers in the electrochemical cell. The results obtained indicate that the retinyl acetate coated inside PVA/ β -CD nanofibers webs much better protected against oxidation to extend the shelf-life than RA encapsulated in PVA nanofibers stored at room conditions. In addition, RA encapsulated in the PVA/ β -CD has better thermal stability than PVA nanofibers. The results show that, electro spinning technique has a promising potential in food industries for the production of efficient and effective encapsulating functional bio-actives under ultra-thin nanostructures.

Speaker
Biography:

Dongho Dongmo Fabrice Fabie is presently working at Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Cameroonn .

Abstract:

Background and Objective: Crude palm oil (CPO) is the richest known source of pro-vitamin A. It is therefore very important to contribute to fight against vitamin A deficiency. Surveys done in Douala town showed that populations use to expose CPO to open air during distribution and heat it when cooking. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of short exposure to sunlight and of heating on carotenoids from CPO.
Methodology: Firstly, CPO was exposed to sunlight during 14h. Then, samples were collected and kept at 4°C for analysis of carotenoids content, free fatty acid (FFA) and peroxide value (PV). Secondly, CPO was heated at 50°C, 120°C, 200°C or 400°C for 30, 60 or 120min and samples were cooled down and kept at 4°C until analysis of carotenoids content, FFA and PV. Finally, we studied the effect of heating of CPO in the food matrix (case of maize cake). Thus, maize cake was steamed on gas stove (100±5°C) during exactly 1, 2, 3 or 4h and kept at 4°C until analysis of moisture and carotenoids contents.
Results: The results showed that short exposure to sunlight did not significantly affect carotenoids content, FFA and PV of CPO. However, heating accelerated the formation of peroxides and degradation of carotenoids. Destruction of carotenoids increased with both temperature and duration of exposure to heat. FFA did not significantly change during heating. Likewise, during heating of CPO in the food matrix carotenoids content decreased significantly with cooking time. Conclusions: These results suggest that short exposure to sunlight does not have a significant effect on carotenoids content of CPO. But, its heating (directly or in the food matrix) results to significant degradation of carotenoids.

Moras Benjamin

Université de Toulouse
France

Title: Pressurized water extraction of soybean isoflavones

Time : 17:25-17:40

Speaker
Biography:

Moras Benjamin is a Ph.D. student working at the Laboratory of Agro-Industrial Chemistry of Toulouse in France specialized on the extraction and purification of natural compounds. He is graduated in Master's degree "Phytoressources" from "Universite Claude Bernard de Lyon". His research works focused on the purification of proteins and polyphenols for food applications from two major crops which are soybean and rice. Extraction of isoflavones from soybean represents an important challenge in this project. A study on the optimization of the ethanolic extraction of soybean isoflavones have been presented in two congresses: at the 9th International Conference on Renewable Resources & Biorefineries in Antwerpen in Belgium and at the "XIVe congres de la Societe Française de Genie des Procedes". As an eco-friendly process the pressurized water extraction was also studied.

Abstract:

The extraction and analysis of soybean isoflavones represents an increasing interest because there are bioactive compounds with several in-vitro beneficial properties and effects on menopausal symptoms. Isoflavones are commonly extracted with organic solvent which is not suitable for food. Subcritical water conditions can be achieved in pressurized liquid extraction which allows the extraction of a wider range of compounds towards less polarity. This study provides a new way for the extraction of isoflavones using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) to evaluate the potential of pressurized water. A three levels Doehlert experimental design was conducted and surface methodology permitted to determine the effect of temperature, static time and amount of soy flour or soybean protein isolate on isoflavones extraction. The optimal conditions conducted to a high extraction yield of 85%. The amount of introduced material in the ASE cell was the overriding factor to achieve high yields with the different materials and secondly temperature with less influence. A larger proportion of proteins in the second material lowered the isoflavones yield to 63%. This study showed that a high water extraction yield of isoflavone was possible without organic solvents and provided information about the influence of proteins.

Emmanuel Adu Amankwah

Wageningen University
The Netherlands

Title: Modeling the drying and sorption behavior of yam (Dioscoreaceae rotundata)

Time : 17:40-17:55

Speaker
Biography:

E. A. Amankwah is presently a Ph.D. student at the Wageningen University Research Center, The Netherlands and a lecturer at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals and currently working on his final thesis.

Abstract:

Drying experiments on a pilot scale air dryer in the temperature range 30–500C and sorption isotherms at 25 and 50 of yam (D. rotundata, Dente) cuts were investigated. Drying empirical models were fitted to the experimental drying and sorption datas. The Henderson and Pabis model fitted well the experimental drying data while the GAB model fitted well the desorption data. The drying rate, showed strong relationship with temperature. By ignoring shrinkage effective moisture diffusivity ranged between 2.29x10-11 – 6.65x10-11 while activation energy was recorded as 44.06 kJ/mol. Diffusivity was observed to be a function of temperature.

Speaker
Biography:

Jumoke Olatujoye graduated with a B.Tech. in Food Science and Technology and had her Master’s degree in Food Technology-Quality Assurance at the University of Reading, UK in 2010. A food science and technology lecturer for some years and currently on a study leave for her Ph.D. program at the University of Reading on a scholarship called Tertiary Education Trust Fund (TEFT). Her area of interest is in food biotechnology, dairy technology, bioactive and functional food ingredients and plant-derived polyphenols in beverages.

Abstract:

Wine is one of the most important sources of dietary polyphenols with antioxidant properties. These polyphenols are also responsible for astringency and bitterness which are organoleptic characteristics of many foods and beverages. Astringency is perceived as dryness and/or a tactile sensation caused by the precipitated complex formed between polyphenols and saliva proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of rennet whey proteins and peptides on astringency resulting from the interaction between model saliva proteins and polyphenols. A protein precipitation method was employed to determine astringency since the perception of oral astringency is the result of a similar precipitation of the saliva protein by tannin. Astringency was estimated chemically by employing the ovalbumin precipitation method which evaluates astringency as a measure of equivalent tannic acid concentration. We hypothesized that the addition of certain whey proteins/peptides will compete with proteins in saliva in their interaction with tannins and in this way reduce astringency. Several whey proteins and hydrolysates containing β-lactoglobulin and caseinomacropeptides were tested. Interactions between proteins and polyphenols were investigated by fluorescence quenching and the size of particles by dynamic light scattering. In addition, the phenolic composition of the treated wine was analyzed by HPLC. The effect of whey proteins and peptides on the astringency was dependent on the protein type and concentration. A greater reduction of astringency was obtained with the proteins consisting mainly of β-lactoglobulin at the concentrations tested compared to the peptides. Precipitation of polyphenol was seen with both low and high molecular weight whey proteins. The findings illustrated that high molecular weight polypeptides may be able to play an important role in reducing astringency and that in this role they are superior than the low molecular weight polypeptides. The outcomes of this study could be of particular interest to improving wine quality during wine making processes.

Speaker
Biography:

Wai-Kun Chan is a master's degree student from department of Food Science National I-Lan University, Taiwan. He has participated in 2013 Spring World Congress on Engineering and Technology oral presentation, the title is Statistical comparison of nitrate concentrations in three vegetables as affected by environmental changes over 24 hrs periods. Now, his research purpose is analysis of the phenolic acids composition of plants.

Abstract:

Samples for the Wild Indigo analysis were obtained directly from the roots of several native plants in a field in Texas USA. Four samples of Asian Indigowoad were purchased from four different stores. This study found that the total phenol content of Wild Indigo root was 16.43 ± 0.51 mg/g dw, whereas the Indigowoad root varied from 5.14 ± 0.41 to 13.63 ± 0.14 mg/g dw. The total phenol content of the Wild Indigo root was found to be significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of the Indigowoad root. Specific phenolic acid contents of the roots of these two plants were also determined; however, they were only determined for the two samples of the four that had the highest total phenol contents out of the Asian Indigowoad root. The Wild Indigo had 40.19 ± 14.42 mg/g dw total Gallic acid while the two Indigowoad samples had none. For Vanillic acid, Wild Indigo had 7.31 ± 0.33 while the Indigowoad had 5.78 ± 0.06 for one sample and 3.70 ± 0.20 for the other sample. For Syringic acid, Wild Indigo had 33.32 ± 0.30 while the Indigowoad had 46.11 ± 1.35 for one sample and 36.84 ± 1.22 for the other sample. For p-Coumaric acid, Wild Indigo had 53.20 ± 0.27 while the Indigowoad had 61.07 ± 0.74 for one sample and 29.65 ± 0.61 for the other sample. For Ferulic acid, Wild Indigo had132.04 ± 49.06 while the Indigowoad had 132.06 ± 0.02 for one sample and 56.22 ± 6.51 for the other sample.

Speaker
Biography:

Emma Loughrill received a first class honors for B.Sc. in Bioscience at the University of Greenwich in June 2012, where she was also awarded the Best Performing Student in Bioscience Award by the Society of Biology. She is currently undertaking a Ph.D. under the Vice Chancellor’s scholarship scheme at the University of Greenwich in the analysis and development of infant foods in the UK. Prior to her postgraduate studies she worked for four years at Pfizer’s pharmaceutical company in Allergy and Respiratory.

Abstract:

The study reported herein was conducted to establish the concentration of two essential fatty acids; linoleic acid (LA) 18:2 n-6 and α-linolenic acid (ALA) 18:3 n-3; and three long chain poly unsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA); eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 20:5 n-3, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 22:6 n-3 and arachidonic acid (AA) 20:4 n-6 in fish based commercial infant foods in the UK. Quantitative analyses were conducted on four different products using charged aerosol detection HPLC. The total daily intake of fatty acids from the consumption of such products was estimated based on the standard menu by Zand et al. The LA:ALA ratio was found to be higher than the recommended ratio. Furthermore the concentrations of DHA and AA were found to be lower than recommended adequate intakes, which may have negative effects vision and brain development of infants.

Akinola Olubunmi

Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta
Nigeria

Title: Performance evaluation of an electronic storage chamber for tomato crop

Time : 18:40-18:55

Speaker
Biography:

Akinola, Olubunmi A. is a Lecturer and a Ph.D. student in the Department of Electrical / Electronics Engineering of the Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, Nigeria. He has served at different capacities in the development of the Department and the University. He has taught several courses at both Undergraduate and Post graduate levels. He has to his credit some papers in reputable journals and international conference proceedings.

Abstract:

The major problem faced by farmers is the rapid deterioration of harvested crops as a result of inadequate storage facilities which is also peculiar to tomato crop. This problem has led to heavy loses of farmer's produce during post-harvest period which in turns result to reduction in farmer's income and availability of the crop for a longer time for consumption. This paper evaluates the performance of an electronic storage chamber for tomatoes. The electronic storage chamber was designed to monitor and control temperature and humidity level. The storage chamber comprised of the cooling unit, the electronic controlling circuit, power control circuit, switching and logic circuits and transducer. The reference values used were 9.5oC for temperature and 95% humidity level. The output was interfaced to the power control circuit of the cooling system, and the humidity adjusting mechanism to keep the state of the chamber to these desired values. The maximum mass of tomatoes designed for storage in the chamber was 10 kg. Tests were carried out for eight weeks and the corresponding tomato parameters in terms of weight, firmness, ripening index and percentage cumulative spoilage were obtained. The result of the percentage deterioration of the weight, firmness, percentage cumulative spoilage and ripening indices for the chamber was compared with the control; original tomato parameters. These were 28.9 and 95%, 9.9 and 97.9%, 19.4 and 96.5%, 72 and 195 respectively. This paper has shown that the performance of electronic storage chamber will significantly improve the shelf - life of tomato crop.

Break: 18:55-19:30 Cocktails sponsored by Journal of Fermentation Technology @ Foyer
  • Workshop
Location: Hampton Events Center A

Session Introduction

Dilek Heperkan

Istanbul Technical University
Turkey

Title: Antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria on pathogens in foods

Time : 16:45-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Dilek Heperkan has completed her Ph.D. in 1986 from Egean University, Turkey. She worked as a researcher for 10 years in TUBITAK, National Scientific and Research Institute. She participated as a member of World Working Party of Mycotoxin (2002-2007). She worked as a visiting scientist in countries such as Belgium, Germany, Netherland and United Kingdom. She also worked for sabbatical in the USA in 2001. She also visited Universite de Vigo, Spain and gave lectures by Erasmus Programme in 2007. She organized a number of national and international meetings. Recently, she organized 23rd International Food Micro 2012 Congress together with ICFMH. She is currently working as a full time Professor in Istanbul Technical University, Food Engineering Department.

Abstract:

Lactic acid bacteria are inhibitory to pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in foods. Viable lactic acid bacteria (LAB) or their antimicrobial metabolites are used for this purpose world vide. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram (+), catalase and oxidase (-) non-spore forming, non-motile, resistant to acid and high fermentative ability. A variety number of antimicrobial substances such as organic acids, bacteriosins, hydrogen peroxide and diasetil are produced by LAB depending on the type of lactic acid bacteria. Among them bacteriocins are well known antimicrobials which active against closely related species to producing organism. Bacteriocins are peptides or proteins produced by LAB and thus regarded as natural. Therefore using LAB is an alternative method to improve the keeping quality and safety of many food products. However only a few of them like nisin is available commercially. In this presentation lactic acid bacteria and their antimicrobial production, LAB species isolated from fermented foods and their activities against Staphylococcus aures, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium will be discussed in detail.