Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology Las Vegas, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Daniel Y. C. Fung

Kansas State University
USA

Keynote: Rapid methods and automation in microbiology: Past, present and future

Time : 09:05-10:05

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Daniel Y. C. Fung photo
Biography:

Daniel Y. C. Fung is a microbiologist in the field of rapid methods and automation in microbiology. He has published extensively in food microbiology, applied microbiology and rapid methods with more than 700 Journal articles, meeting abstracts, proceeding papers, book chapters and books in his career.

Abstract:

Rapid methods and automation in microbiology is a relatively new area of study in applied microbiology. He literally stimulated the developments of this field by his Ph.D. dissertation at Iowa State University in 1969 entitled "Rapid methods for determining Staphylococcal Toxins and Salmonella associated with poultry products”. From that modest beginning he developed many miniaturized systems for diagnostic bacteriology. At that same time many commercial companies started similar diagnostic kits mainly concerning medical microbiology. Soon these miniaturized kits found the way into food, water, air, soil and environmental areas for rapid and efficient ways to detect and identify a great variety of microbes to this very day. With increased developments in instrumentation and molecular microbiology, the field will certainly expend and touch on even more areas related to human and animal health, food, water, air, and environmental monitoring systems in the near and far future. The presenter will conclude this talk with his 10 point visions into the near and far future.

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozlem Tokusoglu photo
Biography:

Ozlem Tokusoglu has completed her Ph.D. at Ege University engineering faculty, department of Food engineering at 2001. She is currently working as Associate professor and faculty member in Celal Bayar University engineering faculty department of food engineering. She performed a visiting scholar at the food science and nutrition department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as visiting professor at the school of food science, Washington state University and Pullman, Washington, USA during April-May 2010. She organized and directed as Conference Chair at the International Congress entitled ANPFT2012 (Advanced Non-thermal Processing in Food Technology) effects on quality and shelf-life of food and beverages in May, 2012 at Kusadasi-Aegean, Turkey (www.anpft2012.org). She served as organizing committee member at 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Nutritional Science & Therapy Conference in July 2013 at Philadelphia, USA. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of International Journal of Food Science and Technology (IJFST) by Wiley publisher, USA and Journal of food, agriculture and environment (JFAE) by WFL publisher, Finland. She published the scientific edited two book entitled fruit and cereal bio-actives, chemistry, sources and applications by CRC press, Taylor & Francis, USA publisher and entitled improved food quality with novel food processing by CRC press, third book Food by-product based functional food powders is in progress.

Abstract:

Ultrasound is one of the emerging technologies that were developed to minimize processing, maximize quality and improve the food product preservation and the quality. Ultrasound (US) is applied to impart positive effects in food processing such as improvement in microbial inactivation, mass transfer, inactivation or acceleration of enzymatic activity to enhance shelf life, assistance of thermal treatments and texture manipulation, facilitating the extraction of various foods/plants and enhancing of bioactive components of foods. US generally uses intensities higher than 1Wcm-2 at frequencies between 20 and 1000 kHz, that are disruptive and induce effects on the chemical-biochemical, physical, or mechanical properties of foods and can be used in preservation and safety and are applying to food enzymes, in microbial inactivation, in ultrasound assisted extraction. Also, US can be used for improved sensory, texture and color quality and microbial stability of plant food resources including fruit and vegetables, fruit juices, peels, oils and fat-based products, cereals products as bread dough, batters and biscuits, food pastes. \\\\r\\\\nUS can be used for stimulation of living cell activity (algal activity etc.) or sonochemical destruction, stimulation of ezymatical activity or controlled denaturing of unwanted enzymes, improved extraction, improved impregnation, improved homogenization (for milk, for whey etc.), prevented oxidation of foods, improved texture (for cheese making, for chocolate manufacturing), for meat tenderness, for emulsion stability of foods, for crystallization and freezing, for filtration and drying. The monitoring the attenuation of an ultrasound pulse has been proved possible to determine the degree effects. Besides, the measurement of ultrasound velocity in conjunction with attenuation can be used to estimate the degree of emulsification in such foods. The use of an ultrasound process during the mixing step of foam production in foods may lead to better quality products. \\\\r\\\\nWe deal with the determination of the improved qualities of chocolate manufacturing, cheese making technology by ultrasound processing as case studies. Chocolate quality is highly dependent on tempering stage of the manufacturing process owing to tempering is critical for reducing processing failures and ensuring a quality end product. 150 kHz of application for cocoa mix gave the pleasant texture, good mold stability, stable shelf-life and good resistance to fat bloom. The effects of US treatment on the lipid oxidation stability in whey for gravyer cheese, lor cheese making and for cheese-based sweet manufacturing were determined at 400-600 kHz of frequencies. Fatty acids, major phospholipids and texture quality were good and US can be utilized in whey processing applications with no negative impact. \\\\r\\\\nIt was concluded that the approach of ultrasound applying to assist food preparation could be of great interest to food manufacturers for the innovative and safe food products.\\\\r\\\\n

Keynote Forum

Gabriela Riscuta

National Cancer Institute
USA

Keynote: Fermented dairy products in cancer risk and prevention

Time : 10:30-10:55

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gabriela Riscuta photo
Biography:

Gabriela Riscuta MD, MS. CNS is a Program Director in the nutritional science research group at the division of cancer prevention, National Cancer Institute. In this position she plans, develops, directs, and coordinates extramural research programs in diet, nutrition and cancer as related to cancer prevention. At NCI, her role includes the examination of bioactive food components, i.e., as modifiers of cancer risk and tumor behavior in relation to specific genes and/or micro biome activity. She received a prestigious Merit Award in 2012 from NIH for the creation of a webinar series for physicians and researchers to understand the strength and the weakness of the evidence about the health effects of a food/bioactive food components.

Abstract:

Milk and dairy products contain micronutrients and bioactive constituents, which may influence cancer risk and progression. Historically, under the action of indigenous micro flora found in milk, the fermentation arose spontaneously. Today, controlled fermentation process is used to enhance taste and to increase the digestibility and shelf life of dairy products. Some fermented dairy products, have been evaluated in regard to their potential benefits in cancer prevention. In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research report concluded that probable it is an association between milk intake and lower risk of colorectal cancer. Two new large cohort studies show possible protective effect against bladder cancer, associated with an increased intake of cultured dairy products in some populations. Efforts are made to understand the underlying mechanisms beyond these effects. Future studies need to clarify who might benefit and who may be placed at risk in relation to fermented dairy products consumption.

Keynote Forum

Alison Burton Shepherd

King’s College London
UK

Keynote: Sugar and fat how bad is that?

Time : 10:55-11:20

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alison Burton Shepherd  photo
Biography:

Alison Burton Shepherd is a queen's nurse and tutor in nursing at Florence Nightingale School of nursing and Midwifery kings college London. She has over 80 publications which have been peer reviewed. She is also a registered nutritionist and is on the Editorial Board of the Journal for Food and Nutritional Disorders (USA) and is a regular contributor to Network Health Dieticians. She still works in a clinical capacity as a nurse advisor for a private out of Hours Company where she works autonomously from home.

Abstract:

The levels of obesity are increasing worldwide which suggests that current interventions are failing to control this epidemic. There is growing pressure on the Food Industry within the UK to reduce the amount of saturated fats (SFA) in a variety of products in an attempt to reduce the incidence of both Coronary Heart Disease and Obesity. In some areas of Europe this has already been achieved. However fat adds both satiety and a pleasant taste experience. Therefore the food industry will need to replace the saturated fats with other nutrients, normally refined carbohydrates to enhance the consumers “taste” experience. Recent evidence suggests that the reduction of SFA in commercially produced foods may only have a marginal impact on CVD and that refined carbohydrates, including sugars may increase the risks of developing CHD. Moreover, it is also argued that reducing the amount of SFA in some food product will not have any significant impact on the levels of obesity. This symposium will critically debate the issue of the role of Sugar and Fat and their associated risks of developing CHD and obesity and will also discuss why, as clinicians it may be best practice to concentrate on “treating the individual and not the disease”.

Break: Coffee Break 11:20-11:35 @ Foyer
OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Osama Ibrahim  photo
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly experienced, principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors, biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bio-conversion, and analytical biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new start up biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

High intense-sweeteners (HIS) provide sweet without calories. The first intense-sweetener is Saccharine that was discovered in 1878 and since then, a number of other low-calorie sweeteners including: peptides structures (Aspartame, Neotame and Alitame), natural extracts (Stevia, Monk fruit Thaumatin and Brazzein) and chemically synthesized (Sucralose, Acesulfame-K, and Cyclamate) have been produced and used around the world. Levels of intense sweeteners used in food production are based on the approved daily intake by food safety Authority. This daily intake level is 100 fold lower than the safe dose demonstrated in studies. In this presentation, chemical structures, manufacturing process, regulatory status and applications in food and drinks for these above intense-sweeteners will be presented with complete details.

Keynote Forum

Claus Muss

International Research Group of Applied Preventive Medicine
Austria

Keynote: Clinical assessment of neutraceuticals in Europe by EFSA

Time : 12:00-12:25

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Claus Muss  photo
Biography:

Claus Muss has completed his doctorates in Medical School Munich and Veterinary School Berlin and his Ph.D. in Public Health Science at St. Elisabeth University Bratislava (SK) where after habilitation he was appointed as associate Professor. Besides his clinical activities in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, he is head of the world wide networking International Research group of applied Preventive Medicine, Coauthor of 7 scientific journals with over 87 own publications.

Abstract:

In the European Union the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is the corner stone of risk assessment regarding food. Inaugurated in January 2002, following a series of food crises in the late 1990s, as an independent source of scientific advice and communication on risks associated with the food chain the goal of EFSA is to improve EU food safety. EFSA produces scientific opinions and advice to provide a sound foundation for European policies and legislation and to support the European Commission, European Parliament and EU Member States in taking effective and timely risk management decisions. This Authority performs environmental risk assessments and its advice underpins the European food safety system. EFSA has also provided scientific advice on the setting of tolerable upper levels of intakes (UL) for vitamins and minerals. These Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) represent the highest level of daily intake of a nutrient that is likely to pose no risk of adverse health effects in Europe. The Regulation on nutrition and health claims made on foods was adopted by the Council and Parliament in 2006. In this frame work of European Food safety assessment I-GAP offers manufacturers and food industry to profile fitting products by preparing EFSA proposals and conducting clinical human trials as well as to document the results in an approvable manner. For this reason I-GAP is closely linked with highly cited and pub med listed scientific journals.

  • Symposium: Biocontrol & antimicrobials for sustainable control of food-borne pathogens - Are we there yet ?
Location: Hampton Events Center A
Speaker
Biography:

Dike O. Ukuku has 27 years of professional experience in food technology, food chemistry and food microbiology in Universities, industry and Government. He has authored more than 70 publications in different scientific journals including 9 proceeding papers, 8 invited book chapters, and 1 text book. He has made over 100 international and national presentations. He is a fellow of the japan society for the promotion of science (JSPS-Fellow) and also a king-chavez-parks future faculty fellow, a member of the science advisory board. He is an editor of three scientific journals and also is on the editorial board membership of applied and environmental microbiology, Journal of Food Science, Journal of Food Protection, International Journal of Food Microbiology, Hortscience, Journal of Food Technology and Processing including Food Technology as an in depth subject matter expert for manuscripts submitted to the journals.

Abstract:

The need for a non-thermal intervention technology that can inactivate microbial populations without altering nutrient quality of liquid foods have been proposed and several of these non-thermal technologies have been commercialized including ultraviolet light (UV-L) and radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing. In this study, the efficacy of a combinational treatment using RFEF and UV-L processing in inactivation of bacteria in apple juice inoculated with E. coli bacteria at 7.8 log CFU/ml was investigated. The apple juice inoculated with bacteria was processed with a laboratory scale RFEF at 20 kHz, 15 kV/cm for 170 µs at a flow rate of 540 ml/min followed by UV-light treatment at 400C. Treated samples were monitored for the presence of surviving and injured bacteria. Also, the juice was analyzed for possible presence of UV-absorbing substances leaked out from membrane damaged bacteria. Sorbitol MacConky Agar (SMAC) and Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA) plates were used to determine viability loss and percent injury. UV-light treatment alone caused 6.3 log reduction of E. coli in apple juice while RFEF caused only 1.5 log reduction. Percent injury caused by RFEF and UV-light processing alone averaged 95% and < 1 %, respectively. A combination of the two processing treatments did not increase cell injury or leakage of UV-substances. However, the UV-absorbing substances determined in RFEF treated apple juice was significantly (P>0.05) different than UV-light treated samples, suggesting that the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by RFEF treatment is different from UV-light treatment. Also, RFEF treatment caused more membrane injury and cellular leakage of UV-substances than UV-light treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Modesto Olanya has over 10 years of research experience with the USDA–Agricultural Research Service and is currently based at the Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmoor, PA. His laboratory is conducting applied research on Intervention Technologies for Minimally Processed Foods with emphasis on the bio-control of enteric pathogens on leafy greens at post-harvest. Prior to joining USDA-ARS, he was Regional Pathologist at International Potato Center and based at the Regional Office for Sub-Saharan Africa, in Nairobi, Kenya. He was also an Assistant Research Professor at the University of Maine and a Post-doctoral Fellow at International Institute for Tropical Agriculture at Ibadan, Nigeria. He has authored over 60 publications in reputable national and international journals, and active in various professional societies.

Abstract:

Pathogenic microbes such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella serovars , and Listeria monocytogenes have been reported on fruits and leafy greens and represent enormous food safety risks. Biocontrol, physical and chemical measures are used to reduce and inactivate microbial contamination on produce. In this research, we investigated the efficacy of bio-control on fruits, leafy greens, and in broths. Pathogenic microbes were inoculated at 4 log cfu/g and the biocontrol applied at 6 log cfu/g or ml. In experiments on the efficacy of biocontrol of Salmonella serovars (Typhimurium, Poona, Montevideo) by Pseudomonas spp., reductions of Salmonella ranged from 0.29-1.47 log cfu/ml. Similarly, reductions of E. coli O157:H7 with P. fluorescens on spinach ranged from 0.5-2.1 log cfu/g. Bio-control efficacy was significantly (P<0.05) impacted by storage temperatures and time as optimum reductions were observed at 15 deg C (1.5-2.4 log cfu/g). When P. chlororaphis and P. fluorescens were co-inoculated with Salmonella serovars, their bio-control efficacies were similar. Assessment of Bacteriovorax spp. on E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella serovars demonstrated predation of these foodborne pathogens with Bacteriovorax spp. implying great potential for bio-control of pathogenic bacteria on produce. It appears that concurrent use of multiple bio-control (non-pathogenic) microbes and combinations of measures may greatly enhance their efficacies on foodborne pathogens.

Lamin S. Kassama

Alabama A&M University
USA

Title: The impact of non-thermal processes on food quality and safety

Time : 13:05-13:25

Speaker
Biography:

Lamin S. Kassama obtained his Ph.D. from the Department of Bioresource Engineering, McGill University Montreal, Canada. He is currently an Assistant Professor Food Processing and Engineering at Alabama A&M University, Huntsville Alabama. His research focuses on the application of novel technologies to enhance food quality and safety, with emphasizes on food structure, thermo-physical and rheological properties, heat and mass transfer, packaging, emerging technologies (Pulsed Ultraviolet (UV), Ultrasound) application in food processing. Current he is a Co-PI on a USDA grant focusing on Evaluation of multiple-hurdle antimicrobial technologies on inactivation of Escherichia coli O26, O45, and O104:H4 when compared to O157:H7.

Abstract:

Despite the efforts made by the scientific community to reduce the prevalence of foodborne pathogens in food systems, it still remains to be a serious public health concern. Most of the foodborne illness outbreaks occur as a result of consumption of contaminated foods. Hence efforts are being made to minimize/eliminate this risk from the food supply chain. A plethora of physical and chemical intervention methods have been explored to inactivate foodborne pathogens in food products, but no-one-method was found to be 100% effective, particularly in fresh produce. One significant challenge of non-thermal processes is situations where microorganisms are entrap in fat matrix in foods. Thus, limit the penetrating energy intensity directed toward microbes in fat protective environment and likewise the hydrophobicity of the boundary condition that impedes the penetration capacity in situations where water based antimicrobial agents are used. Currently, “multiple-hurdle” intervention approaches such as non-thermal technologies in minimal process are being explored by researchers. In this symposium, the combination of some of these technologies (Pulse ultraviolet light (PUV), Ultra-sonication (US) and Antimicrobial agents (AA)) in effectively controlling microbial proliferation will be discussed. The discussion will highlight the basic principles of PUV, US and their interactive effects and mechanism of microbial inactivation in food products. Additionally, comparative analysis against conventional thermal process processing methods will be presented. The scientific information presented will be appealing to both scientific and industry audience as presentation will demonstrate the impact of non-thermal technology on food quality and safety.

Break: Lunch Break 13:25-14:10 @ Coral B
Speaker
Biography:

Dike O. Ukuku has 27 years of professional experience in food technology, food chemistry and food microbiology in Universities, industry and Government. He has authored more than 70 publications in different scientific journals including 9 proceeding papers, 8 invited book chapters, and 1 text book. He has made over 100 international and national presentations. He is a fellow of the japan society for the promotion of science (JSPS-Fellow) and also a king-chavez-parks future faculty fellow, a member of the science advisory board. He is an editor of three scientific journals and also is on the editorial board membership of applied and environmental microbiology, Journal of Food Science, Journal of Food Protection, International Journal of Food Microbiology, Hortscience, Journal of Food Technology and Processing including Food Technology as an in depth subject matter expert for manuscripts submitted to the journals.

Abstract:

The ability of pathogenic bacteria to adhere to surfaces of fruits and vegetables continues to be a potential food safety problem for the produce industry and consumers alike. Presence of human bacterial pathogens in fresh produce and outbreaks of diseases has led to costly recalls. Fruits and vegetables are frequently in contact with soil, insects, animals, and humans during growing, harvesting, and in the processing plant. In this study, the bacterial cell surface charge in relation to attachment on melon surfaces and decontamination with hot water and sanitizers was investigated. Cell surface charge of individual strains of Listeria monocytogenes serovars, E. coli and E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. were estimated and attachment to melon surfaces was initiated. Contaminated melons were subjected to water and hot water treatment including washing in 200 ppm chlorine and hydrogen peroxide at 3% for 5 min. The initial bacterial attachment was highest for individual strains of E. coli and lowest for L. monocytogenes. Following decontamination treatment, Salmonella exhibited stronger attachment than E. coli and L. monocytogenes. When mixed genera cocktails were used the relative degree of attachment of the three genera was altered. A linear correlation between bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity (r2 = 0.767), negative charge (r2 = 0.738), and positive charge (r2 = 0.724) and their strength of attachment to melon surfaces was observed.

Speaker
Biography:

Modesto Olanya has over 10 years of research experience with the USDA–Agricultural Research Service and is currently based at the Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmoor, PA. His laboratory is conducting applied research on Intervention Technologies for Minimally Processed Foods with emphasis on the bio-control of enteric pathogens on leafy greens at post-harvest. Prior to joining USDA-ARS, he was Regional Pathologist at International Potato Center and based at the Regional Office for Sub-Saharan Africa, in Nairobi, Kenya. He was also an Assistant Research Professor at the University of Maine and a Post-doctoral Fellow at International Institute for Tropical Agriculture at Ibadan, Nigeria. He has authored over 60 publications in reputable national and international journals, and active in various professional societies.

Abstract:

Bacteriovorax spp. (Bvx) is delta proteobacteria adapted to marine ecosystems where salinity concentration ranges from 1-3%. Due to their predation of Gram-negative bacteria, Bvx may have great potential for bio-control of food-borne pathogens on fruits and leafy greens. The goal of this research was to optimize the plaque assay for quantifying Bvx isolates. We determined the predation of E. coli O157:H7 (Ec) and formation of Bvx plaques by Bvx strains G3, S11, OR7, and OS1 on polypeptone peptone medium (PP20) amended with sterilized seawater (SW) in a double agar plaque assay. For plaque assays of Bvx, bottom and top PP20 agar layers were amended with: a) NaCl (bottom layer) +SW (top layer), b) SW (bottom)+NaCl (top), c) SW (bottom)+SW (top), and d) NaCl-MgCl-CaCl (bottom)+NaCl (top) and plaques were enumerated on Ec host cells. The effects of incubation temperatures (22, 26, 31, 37 ºC) on plaque development were assessed on lawns of Ec. Plaque forming units (PFU/ml) on PP20 amended with SW ranged from 0.56 x 106 (OR7) to 2.07 x 106 (isolate S11). PP20 amended with NaCl and divalent calcium and magnesium had the lowest mean number of plaques (0.73 x 106 PFU/ml), while SW+NaCl (1.22 x 106) had the greatest counts. Storage temperatures varied with Bvx, as temperature optima for OR7 and S11 was 26 ºC, but were non-significant (P>0.05) for G3. These results suggest that food-borne pathogens and Bvx may be assessed on PP20 devoid of SW, which could otherwise provide a source of variability from one seawater collection to another. Storage temperatures and media amendment provide useful parameters for quantifying Bacteriovorax efficacy as a bio-control agent.


  • Track 1: Frontiers in Food Science
    Track 2: Breaking Innovations in Food and Beverage
    Track 3: Food Safety, Food Preservation, Quality Standard and Food Systems Management
    Track 4: Food Physical Chemistry
    Track 7: Nutrition and Nutritional Management
Location: Hampton Events Center A
Speaker

Chair

Osama Ibrahim

BioInnovation
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Modesto Olanya

FSIT-ERRC-ARS-USDA
USA

Session Introduction

Osama Ibrahim

BioInnovation
USA

Title: Oligosaccharides: An overview of beneficial sweeteners for food products

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly experienced, principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids, food flavors, biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bio-conversion, and analytical biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new start up biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Oligosaccharides are carbohydrates that have three to six units of simple sugars (monosaccharides). They are found in many plants with large amounts include Jerusalem artichokes from which most commercial inulin is extracted. They are also found in onions, garlic, legumes, wheat, asparagus and other plant foods. Most oligosaccharides have a mildly sweet taste and have certain other characteristics, such as mouth feel they lend to food. This mouth feels characteristic interest food industry to add oligosaccharides in some foods as a partial substitute for fat and sugars and to improve texture. Because 90 % of oligosaccharides escapes digestion in small intestine and reach the colon where it perform a different function as a growth factor (prebiotics) that enhance the growth of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) in the colon. This recent benefit has increased the market for oligosaccharides. Properties, benefits, legal status and manufacturing process for oligosaccharides available in the market will be highlighted in this presentation.

Annette C. Bentley

American Celiac Society
USA

Title: Glycomacropeptide extraction

Time : 15:10-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Annette C. Bentley has obtained M.S. degree in medical education from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 2003. She has also obtained a M.S. degree in food science from Louisiana State University in May of 2013. She founded and serves as the President of the American Celiac Society. She has been published in the Journal of General Psychology and the Who sprue (American Celiac Newsletter) the lifeline (CSAUSA newsletter) and the Eucharistic ministry. She has done many presentations at conference throughout the world.

Abstract:

Glycomacropeptide (GMP) preparation was used on defatted cow’s milk to produce curds for developing new cheese products. In this study we started out with one gallon of skim milk as a test procedure. In each trial we initiated all the initial protocol. Initially we checked the pH to verify that it was between 6.2-6.8. We then added gradually N HCl and mixing well to bring the pH down to between 4.59-4.6. After obtaining the appropriate pH the milk was left standing, allowed to precipitate and cooked to about 50°C. The casein was separated from the whey by filtering the whey through several layers of cheese cloth. The casein was then washed three times with 1 N HCl to completely remove all of the whey from the casein. The casein was then dissolved into a solution of sodium citrate and a solution of calcium chloride. The pH was checked after this procedure. If it was not between 6.7-6.8 2 N NaOH was added gradually and mixed well until it reached this level. The casein was then homogenized. After homogenization the casein was allowed to equilibrate to approximately 37°C. Rennet was added to casein solution. The casein was stirred gently and incubated for three hours until it formed a gel. The casein was then filtered and the GMP was obtained and stored at 4°C. The curds were kept for a new product line. Each time we performed the procedure we refined the method in keeping with the guidelines of the protocol. We were able to obtain good quality curd for new products. In this study we were able to develop flavored cheese and a flavored cheese drink. Whey was also obtained which could be used for other products. Additionally, obtained was the GMP which has potential health benefits.

Markus Link

Bruker BioSpin GmbH Rheinstetten
Germany

Title: Food analysis to check quality, safety and authenticity by full-automated 1H-NMR

Time : 15:30-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Markus Link joined Bruker BioSpin GmbH in Rheinstetten, Germany in 2009 as Business Development Manager of ‘Applied-NMR’ solutions in the food and beverage market worldwide. He was born in Mannheim, Germany in 1962. He did his degree in horticulture at the University of Applied Sciences in Wiesbaden (1987-1990), Germany, and his Master`s degree in biology at University Mainz (1990-1994), Germany, followed by his doctorate at Max-Planck-Institute in Ladenburg, Germany, in 1997 (Molecular biology and protein biochemistry). Parallel to employment in 2003 he did a degree in business economics in Kaiserslautern, Germany. He worked at Tecan Germany, Hamilton Life Science Robotics (both as Territory Manager) and Thermo Fisher Scientific (Senior Sales Industrial Solutions) before he joined Bruker.

Abstract:

Full-automated high resolution 1H-NMR spectroscopy offers unique screening capabilities for food quality and safety by combining non-targeted and targeted screening in one analysis (15 - 20 minutes from acquisition to report). Full-automated high resolution 1H-NMR (400 MHz) has found its way into the quality control of food and beverages over the last years. The advantage of full-automated high resolution 1H-NMR is its absolute reproducibility and transferability for laboratory to laboratory, which is not equaled by other methods currently used in food analysis. NMR reproducibility allows statistical investigations e.g. for detection of variety, mixing of varieties, geographical origin and adulterations, where smallest changes of many ingredients at the same time must be recorded. Reproducibility and transferability of the solutions shown are user-, instrument- and laboratory-independent. Sample preparation, measurement and processing are based on strict standard operation procedures which are substantial for this fully automated solution. The non-targeted approach to the data allows detecting even unknown deviations, if they are visible in the 1H-NMR spectra of e.g. fruit juice, wine, edible oils or honey. The same data acquired in high throughput mode are also subjected to quantification of multiple compounds. The fully automated 1H-NMR methodology will shortly be introduced and then results on fruit juices, wine and edible oils will be presented and the advantages of the fully automated 1H-NMR solutions shown. The method has been proven on fruit juices and wine, where so far unknown frauds could be detected. In addition conventional targeted parameters are obtained in the same analysis. This technology has additionally the advantage that NMR is completely quantitative and concentration calibration only has to be done once for all compounds.

Massimo Cecaro

EIC, National Councilor of Italian Medical Press Association
Italy

Title: Food and globalization: How trying to preserve food healthiness with an easy communication

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Massimo Cecaro was born at Macerata, Italy, in 1980. After completing humanistic studies, he moved to the University of Camerino, where he achieved a master degree in veterinary medicine then in University of Teramo where he successfully specialized. He is a journalist from 2004 and national councilor of National Association of Medical Press (ASMI). He is a resident member of MJA “Medical Journalists’ Association” in London. He is also editor in chief of JMCJ (Journal of Mass Communication & Journalism), and in the editorial board of “Occupational Medicine & Health Affairs”. He has been author of several scientific works in public health. He is actively involved in international projects to improve the role of mass-media in medical sciences.

Abstract:

Death and hospitalization consequent to food poisoning represent a serious burden for all countries. Media are mainly focused on “well eating” but final consumer has no practical strategy to fight hazards due to food poisoning as pointed out by many recent surveys. Globalization imposes food travels all across the world. New food technology and processing make that possible using special additives, artificial food colorings and preservatives which might be potentially harmful. Although classification of these substances is well encoded it’s not clear how media can easily read through it. Therefore we need a clear system to decode it and make food additives and preservatives classification easily readable and understandable by the final user. This is extremely important especially for YOPI classes (Young, Old, Pregnancy and Immunodeficiency) which are very sensitive to small contaminations from some additives and preservatives, especially those whom contain sodium benzoate and salicylates. Using a "friendly" and more understandable classification could actually reduce food poisoning and in turns decrease costs of health care. Media could be active part on it, educating the final user on food safety culture especially categories of high risk subjects.

Break: Coffee Break 16:10-16:25 @ Foyer

Megan H. Hargreaves

Queensland University of Technology
Australia

Title: Pseudomonas and salad vegetables: Myth or menace?

Time : 16:25-16:45

Speaker
Biography:

Megan H. Hargreaves graduated from the University of Queensland in 1974 with first class honors in a Bachelor of Science degree, majoring in microbiology. She immediately embarked on an academic career with special interest in the teaching of science, both full time and part time for some years. Her specialist teaching area was that of infection control in the health professions such as Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacy. She joined the Queensland University of Technology in 1993 and adopted the QUT corporate identity as a “University for the Real World” in both her teaching and research interests. She undertook doctoral studies in Higher Education, gaining a Ph.D. in 2000. Since 2000, she has expanded her research interests to include a strong focus based on her earlier interest in infection control, now directed towards environmental microbiology and food quality control. The latter has appropriately included an interest in food manufacturing and fermentation technology. Her publications have covered the gamut of these areas, and include a continuing interest in teaching quality. These publications demonstrate a focus on quality control, with special interest in the microbiological aspects of QC. Further, previously unpublished work includes cutting edge studies on production of food additives using previously unrecognized micro-organisms isolated from the environment. Outside of the academic arena, she continues to act as a senior technical assessor for NATA (the National Association of Testing Authorities) in Australia, with specialty areas of focus in food and water quality.

Abstract:

Most salad vegetables are eaten raw by consumers. However, uncooked or untreated vegetables may pose a risk of transmitting opportunistic bacteria to various risk groups, including cystic fibrosis (CF) sufferers, children and the elderly. In particular, CF patients are vulnerable to chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Clonal variants of P. aeruginosa have been identified as emerging threats however the source of these clones has not yet been definitely demonstrated. Due to the organism’s environmental niche, our team investigated the possibility that salad vegetables may be a source of these clones. To test this conjecture, lettuce, tomatoes, mushrooms and bean sprout packages (n = 150) were analyzed from different categories of supplier: a green grocer, a supermarket and farmers market within the Brisbane (Australia) region, availability permitting. The internal and external areas of the vegetables were analyzed separately in order to establish the site of the contamination (surface or body), which would provide vital clues as to the original source and also that recommendations could be made to decrease or eliminate P. aeruginosa from these foods prior to consumption. Soil and water samples (n = 17) from local farms were also analyzed for the presence of P. aeruginosa, again in order to verify a potential original source of contamination. Although 72 P. aeruginosa were isolated, none of these proved to be clonal strains. The significance of these findings is that vegetables may pose a risk of transmitting sporadic strains of P. aeruginosa to people with CF and possibly, other immune compromised risk groups.

Speaker
Biography:

Jorge A. Saraiva completed his Ph.D. at the age of 26 years from College of Biotechnology (ESB), Portuguese Catholic University (UCP) at Portugal. He coordinates the technological multidisciplinary high pressure platform and co-coordinates the agro-food platform, both of Aveiro University (UA). He is director of the B.Sc. in Biotechnology at UA. He is elected member of the executive committee of the non-thermal processing division (NPD) of institute of food technologists (IFT). He has published more than 75 papers in ISI/SCOPUS indexed journals and serves as referee in more than 20 scientific periodicals.

Abstract:

Since some foods were found in consumable conditions after 10 months at a depth of 1,540 m (~15 MPa) at 3–4 °C, following the sinking and rescue of the research submarine Alvin in the nineties, the possibility of food storage under mild pressure (hyperbaric storage) at cold temperatures, for shelf life extension compared to refrigeration at atmospheric pressure, was proposed1, 2. Still, this possibility requires temperature control throughout storage with the inherent energetic costs. More recently, Segovia-Bravo et al. (2012) showed the possibility of hyperbaric storage (25/100/220 MPa) at 20 °C, for an acidic product (strawberry juice). In parallel, our research group showed the feasibility of preserving a highly perishable food (non -acidic and with high water activity, using watermelon juice as case-study), at naturally variable (uncontrolled) room temperature (RT) conditions (18–21°C) 3. Additionally, the same work showed that watermelon juice could be preserved above RT (30ºC). These results opened promising results to preserve foods at naturally variable (uncontrolled) RT conditions, and so with basically no energetic costs throughout storage, since energy would be only required to generate the pressure and decompress. This possible novel food preservation methodology can slow down microbial growth (50-75 MPa), similarly to refrigeration, with the additional advantage of some microbial inactivation (100 MPa and above) up to 37ºC4. This and more recent results on hyperbaric preservation of foods will be presented and the possible use of this novel food preservation methodology, basically energetically costless, to substitute refrigeration, will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Teresa De Pilli is assistant professor in food technology at Foggia University, Italy. Her researches have been focused on cereal food, microwave drying and extrusion cooking, in particular the utilization of non-conventional flours (oat, bulk wheat, etc.) to produce functional pasta and bakery products. Currently, her researches are focused on biodegradable packaging obtained by extrusion-cooking and edible film. She is scientific research master in 3 projects. She has published more than 100 scientific publications, 2 chapter of book and 1 patent. She has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Sweet cherry is a precious fruit for the wealth of minerals, vitamins and other important protecting, detoxifying and purifying principles. These features make it interesting in terms of nutritional and health point of view. Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects on prevention of cardiovascular and articular diseases due to anti-inflammatory and analgesic action of sweet cherry. However, because of its seasonality it needs technological treatments to be preserved (jam, puree or semi-finished products for pastry) that could compromise its nutritional quality. The aim of this work was to study an innovative pastry with a topping made up of sweet cherries of ‘Ferrovia’ variety with functional properties and with a low content of cholesterol, fat and calories. The effect of ripening stage of sweet cherries used as a filling on qualitative and nutritional characteristics of final product during storage at room temperature without packaging was evaluated. The different ripeness of cherries influenced the mechanical properties of samples in particular; overripe cherries should not be used especially if packaging was not planned because of their greater dehydration during cooking and storage. Significant decrease of functional characteristics was highlighted on cherries with advanced maturity, which compromised the structural and functional properties of pastry. This is why harvest should be standardized for this type of product in order to obtain a product with good nutritional quality.

Speaker
Biography:

Carlos Corassin has graduated in veterinary medicine, master of animal nutrition and Ph.D. in animal science and post doctorate in food engineering. He is currently Professor at the faculty of animal science and food engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. He is involved in microbiology and mycotoxins investigations. He also focuses on technology, safety and quality of food production. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals, several books chapters, besides being reviewer and editorial board member of several scientific journals.

Abstract:

Aflatoxins, a group of carcinogenic mycotoxins, can cause acute and chronic intoxications and also liver cancer in humans and animals. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most potent, having proven toxic properties. Biological decontamination of mycotoxins is one of the well-known strategies for management of mycotoxins in foods and feeds, presenting some advantages over physical and chemical methods. Among the different possible decontaminating microorganisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a potential group since it is widely used in preservation and food fermentation. S. cerevisiae cell wall consists of a network of β-1,3 glucan back bone with β-1,6 glucan side chains, which is attached to highly glycosylated mannoproteins making the external layer. Binding of different mycotoxins to yeast cell surface has been reported. This study was carried out to investigate the efficiency of S. cerevisiae to remove AFB1 in phosphate buffered saline solution (pH 7.3 25°C). S. cerevisiae concentration from four different sources (inactivated dried yeast of sugar cane, autolyzed yeast, cell wall and brewery dehydrated residue) was determined by a Neubauer-counting chamber, using 1 x 1010 non-viable cells for each 3.0 mL of PBS containing 0.5 μg AFB1L-1. The assay was performed at contact times of 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes. Among all analyzed yeasts, the inactivated dried yeast of sugar cane presented highest removal capacity of AFB1, with an average reduction of 98.3%. Autolyzed yeast and brewery dehydrated residue presented extensive removal capacity, with averages of 93.8 and 84.6%. The yeast cell wall showed the lowest removal capacity (82%).

Speaker
Biography:

Diganta Kalita was a post doctoral research associate in the department of horticulture and landscape architecture at Colorado State University, USA. His current research focuses on the investigation of health promoting compounds of potato tubers involved in antioxidant and anti-diabetic activities. He also evaluates the levels of acrylamide, a probable carcinogen and its precursors formed in carbohydrate-rich foods when processed at high temperature. Also he profiles the nutritional composition of French fries and potato chips. He has established track record for effective and result oriented research reflected by 16 peer-reviewed publications.

Abstract:

Polyphenols constitute the major group of human health promoting phytochemicals. They posses’ significant antioxidant activity and play an important role in preventing the oxidative damage of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acid caused by free radicals. Polyphenols also plays a critical role in the formation of acryalmide, a probable carcinogen, in carbohydrate-rich foods that are processed at high temperatures. Potato tubers are known to have significant levels of polyphenols. In this study, we determined the levels asparagine, reducing sugars, total phenolics and antioxidant activities in selected potato cultivars and advanced selections with distinct flesh colors (white, yellow, red and purple) and their role in acrylamide formation in French fries. Tubers with red and purple flesh had higher levels of total phenolics than the white and yellow ones. ABTS and ORAC antioxidant assay demonstrated the highest antioxidant capacities for Purple Majesty (19345, 13886 µmol of TE/serving respectively) and comparable to pomegranate and blueberries. The amount of acrylamide in French fries prepared from selected potato cultivars and advanced selections were ranged from 128.1 to 1651 µg/kg. The levels of asparagine and reducing sugars were positively correlated with acrylamide formation while total phenolics correlated negatively.

Break: 18:45-19:30 Cocktails sponsored by Journal of Food Processing & Technology @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Charles F. L. Mbakaya graduated with a Ph.D. in analytical/food chemistry from Kenyatta University at the age of 50 years. His thesis has contributed to new knowledge by showing that the body physiologically lowers serum zinc levels to produce HIV antibodies necessary in significantly reducing viral load. Consequently, this has led him to re-defining the scientifically contentious cause of AIDS. He is a principal research officer with the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) where he heads the public health and health systems research program. He lectures to and supervises many MPH students and has over 20 papers in reputed journals and has presented papers in 30 local and international conferences. He recently was promoted to the position of Acting Director of the Centre for Public Health Research, a department of KEMRI. He has been invited to membership of prestigious organizations such as the AAAS and the ACS, works on scientific boards of the CCJ and is a member of the Science Advisory Board (SAB).

Abstract:

The hypothesis that the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is HIV has attracted intense and unresolved scientific debate among the scientific elite in the 20th Century and still rages on. While it is common knowledge that various factors in the environment such as biological chemical, physical and psychological hazards are associated with immune-suppression and disease causation; other factors; including nutrition, genetics, age, sex, disease and physical state of a host are known epidemiologically to modify outcomes of exposure to these hazards; they continue to receive very little attention. Nonetheless, selected bio analytical studies conducted in Kenya and beyond show that nutritional interventions indeed do improve immunity in both HIV-seropositive and seronegative persons; leading to resolution of some of the signs and symptoms associated with AIDS. From these studies, micronutrient zinc stands out as a critical immuno-modulator. In one of the selected studies, low optical density of HIV antibodies correlated with high serum zinc levels (p = 0.008) and a low BMI (p = 0.029) as reduction of viral load by more than 0.5 log10 copies/ml correlated with high optical densities of HIV antibodies (p = 0.016); suggesting that lowering of serum zinc may be physiological to enable viral load reduction in the host. Malaria parasitaemia with absence of clinical malaria correlated with high CD4 cell count (p = 0.019), HIV-seronegativity (p = 0.002), low WHO clinical staging of AIDS (p = 0.024) and high serum zinc levels (p = 0.054); suggesting an intact innate immune system (Th-1). Infection with HIV correlated with low NK cell count (p = 0.003), high CD8 cell count (p = 0.0001), low CD4 cell count (p = 0.0001) and low serum zinc levels (p = 0.0001); alluding to the host mounting predominantly humoral immunity (Th-2). Though the findings are tentative, susceptibility to malaria, HIV and AIDS and cancer (by extension as is the case in late stage AIDS) significantly correlates with nutritional parameters as is known epidemiologically. Therefore, innovative application of Food Chemistry/Technology to formulate micronutrient supplements remains largely untapped, yet it has potential to contribute new solutions to difficult public health problems afflicting society and should inevitably be mainstreamed in the scientific research agenda of the 21st Century.

Speaker
Biography:

Krzysztof Dziedzic is employed as a contract researcher (a post-doctoral position) at Poznan University of Life Sciences, Department of food service and catering, Poland. His research is focused on designing bio-food with health-promoting characteristics. The bioavailability of food components is determined in experiments in vitro simulating human gastrointestinal tract. His work also involves research into probiotic properties of bioactive substances and the influence of dietary fibre on bile acid binding in in vitro digestive environment.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to determine the sorption of a primary bile acid (cholic acid - CA) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic – DCA and lithocholic acids - LCA) by bioactive biscuits (BB1 and BB2) in two sections of the gastrointestinal tract. The content of dietary neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and its fractions: cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H) and lignin (L) was assayed using Van Soest method, while total dietary fiber (TDF), soluble (SDF) and insoluble (IDF) fractions were assayed using Asp method. In vitro digestion was carried out in a bioreactor at the temperature of 37°C and constant stirring applied (200 rpm). Enzymes: pepsin and pancreatin, and bile salts: CA, DCA and LCA were added to the culture. In the section of the small intestine, faecal bacteria were added, which had been isolated from human large intestine. The ability to bind bile acids was estimated using UHPLC equipment. Biscuits with bioactive substances – BB1 and BB2 – showed higher DCA acid binding capacity in the small intestine and large intestine sections of the tract, as compared to the control sample (CB). The highest content of TDF was observed in BB1 and BB2 (11.2 and 12.8g/100g of product, respectively) in comparison to control biscuits (CB) - 8.7%. The content of L fraction was highest in BB2 and BB1, 3.26% and 2.38% respectively, while CB and BB1 showed the highest level of H fraction. The highest content of C fraction was observed for BB1 (1.99%), while the lowest for CB (0.95%). Taking into consideration the high content of DF in bioactive biscuits (BB1 and BB2) and their high bile acid sorption ability, it seems that the products can be used as dietary supplements beneficial for human health.