Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology Las Vegas, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Daniel Y. C. Fung

Kansas State University
USA

Keynote: Rapid methods and automation in microbiology: Past, present and future

Time : 09:05-10:05

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Daniel Y. C. Fung photo
Biography:

Daniel Y. C. Fung is a microbiologist in the field of rapid methods and automation in microbiology. He has published extensively in food microbiology, applied microbiology and rapid methods with more than 700 Journal articles, meeting abstracts, proceeding papers, book chapters and books in his career.

Abstract:

Rapid methods and automation in microbiology is a relatively new area of study in applied microbiology. He literally stimulated the developments of this field by his Ph.D. dissertation at Iowa State University in 1969 entitled "Rapid methods for determining Staphylococcal Toxins and Salmonella associated with poultry products”. From that modest beginning he developed many miniaturized systems for diagnostic bacteriology. At that same time many commercial companies started similar diagnostic kits mainly concerning medical microbiology. Soon these miniaturized kits found the way into food, water, air, soil and environmental areas for rapid and efficient ways to detect and identify a great variety of microbes to this very day. With increased developments in instrumentation and molecular microbiology, the field will certainly expend and touch on even more areas related to human and animal health, food, water, air, and environmental monitoring systems in the near and far future. The presenter will conclude this talk with his 10 point visions into the near and far future.

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozlem Tokusoglu photo
Biography:

Ozlem Tokusoglu has completed her Ph.D. at Ege University engineering faculty, department of Food engineering at 2001. She is currently working as Associate professor and faculty member in Celal Bayar University engineering faculty department of food engineering. She performed a visiting scholar at the food science and nutrition department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as visiting professor at the school of food science, Washington state University and Pullman, Washington, USA during April-May 2010. She organized and directed as Conference Chair at the International Congress entitled ANPFT2012 (Advanced Non-thermal Processing in Food Technology) effects on quality and shelf-life of food and beverages in May, 2012 at Kusadasi-Aegean, Turkey (www.anpft2012.org). She served as organizing committee member at 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Nutritional Science & Therapy Conference in July 2013 at Philadelphia, USA. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of International Journal of Food Science and Technology (IJFST) by Wiley publisher, USA and Journal of food, agriculture and environment (JFAE) by WFL publisher, Finland. She published the scientific edited two book entitled fruit and cereal bio-actives, chemistry, sources and applications by CRC press, Taylor & Francis, USA publisher and entitled improved food quality with novel food processing by CRC press, third book Food by-product based functional food powders is in progress.

Abstract:

Ultrasound is one of the emerging technologies that were developed to minimize processing, maximize quality and improve the food product preservation and the quality. Ultrasound (US) is applied to impart positive effects in food processing such as improvement in microbial inactivation, mass transfer, inactivation or acceleration of enzymatic activity to enhance shelf life, assistance of thermal treatments and texture manipulation, facilitating the extraction of various foods/plants and enhancing of bioactive components of foods. US generally uses intensities higher than 1Wcm-2 at frequencies between 20 and 1000 kHz, that are disruptive and induce effects on the chemical-biochemical, physical, or mechanical properties of foods and can be used in preservation and safety and are applying to food enzymes, in microbial inactivation, in ultrasound assisted extraction. Also, US can be used for improved sensory, texture and color quality and microbial stability of plant food resources including fruit and vegetables, fruit juices, peels, oils and fat-based products, cereals products as bread dough, batters and biscuits, food pastes. \\\\r\\\\nUS can be used for stimulation of living cell activity (algal activity etc.) or sonochemical destruction, stimulation of ezymatical activity or controlled denaturing of unwanted enzymes, improved extraction, improved impregnation, improved homogenization (for milk, for whey etc.), prevented oxidation of foods, improved texture (for cheese making, for chocolate manufacturing), for meat tenderness, for emulsion stability of foods, for crystallization and freezing, for filtration and drying. The monitoring the attenuation of an ultrasound pulse has been proved possible to determine the degree effects. Besides, the measurement of ultrasound velocity in conjunction with attenuation can be used to estimate the degree of emulsification in such foods. The use of an ultrasound process during the mixing step of foam production in foods may lead to better quality products. \\\\r\\\\nWe deal with the determination of the improved qualities of chocolate manufacturing, cheese making technology by ultrasound processing as case studies. Chocolate quality is highly dependent on tempering stage of the manufacturing process owing to tempering is critical for reducing processing failures and ensuring a quality end product. 150 kHz of application for cocoa mix gave the pleasant texture, good mold stability, stable shelf-life and good resistance to fat bloom. The effects of US treatment on the lipid oxidation stability in whey for gravyer cheese, lor cheese making and for cheese-based sweet manufacturing were determined at 400-600 kHz of frequencies. Fatty acids, major phospholipids and texture quality were good and US can be utilized in whey processing applications with no negative impact. \\\\r\\\\nIt was concluded that the approach of ultrasound applying to assist food preparation could be of great interest to food manufacturers for the innovative and safe food products.\\\\r\\\\n

Keynote Forum

Gabriela Riscuta

National Cancer Institute
USA

Keynote: Fermented dairy products in cancer risk and prevention

Time : 10:30-10:55

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gabriela Riscuta photo
Biography:

Gabriela Riscuta MD, MS. CNS is a Program Director in the nutritional science research group at the division of cancer prevention, National Cancer Institute. In this position she plans, develops, directs, and coordinates extramural research programs in diet, nutrition and cancer as related to cancer prevention. At NCI, her role includes the examination of bioactive food components, i.e., as modifiers of cancer risk and tumor behavior in relation to specific genes and/or micro biome activity. She received a prestigious Merit Award in 2012 from NIH for the creation of a webinar series for physicians and researchers to understand the strength and the weakness of the evidence about the health effects of a food/bioactive food components.

Abstract:

Milk and dairy products contain micronutrients and bioactive constituents, which may influence cancer risk and progression. Historically, under the action of indigenous micro flora found in milk, the fermentation arose spontaneously. Today, controlled fermentation process is used to enhance taste and to increase the digestibility and shelf life of dairy products. Some fermented dairy products, have been evaluated in regard to their potential benefits in cancer prevention. In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research report concluded that probable it is an association between milk intake and lower risk of colorectal cancer. Two new large cohort studies show possible protective effect against bladder cancer, associated with an increased intake of cultured dairy products in some populations. Efforts are made to understand the underlying mechanisms beyond these effects. Future studies need to clarify who might benefit and who may be placed at risk in relation to fermented dairy products consumption.

Keynote Forum

Alison Burton Shepherd

King’s College London
UK

Keynote: Sugar and fat how bad is that?

Time : 10:55-11:20

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alison Burton Shepherd  photo
Biography:

Alison Burton Shepherd is a queen's nurse and tutor in nursing at Florence Nightingale School of nursing and Midwifery kings college London. She has over 80 publications which have been peer reviewed. She is also a registered nutritionist and is on the Editorial Board of the Journal for Food and Nutritional Disorders (USA) and is a regular contributor to Network Health Dieticians. She still works in a clinical capacity as a nurse advisor for a private out of Hours Company where she works autonomously from home.

Abstract:

The levels of obesity are increasing worldwide which suggests that current interventions are failing to control this epidemic. There is growing pressure on the Food Industry within the UK to reduce the amount of saturated fats (SFA) in a variety of products in an attempt to reduce the incidence of both Coronary Heart Disease and Obesity. In some areas of Europe this has already been achieved. However fat adds both satiety and a pleasant taste experience. Therefore the food industry will need to replace the saturated fats with other nutrients, normally refined carbohydrates to enhance the consumers “taste” experience. Recent evidence suggests that the reduction of SFA in commercially produced foods may only have a marginal impact on CVD and that refined carbohydrates, including sugars may increase the risks of developing CHD. Moreover, it is also argued that reducing the amount of SFA in some food product will not have any significant impact on the levels of obesity. This symposium will critically debate the issue of the role of Sugar and Fat and their associated risks of developing CHD and obesity and will also discuss why, as clinicians it may be best practice to concentrate on “treating the individual and not the disease”.

Break: Coffee Break 11:20-11:35 @ Foyer
OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Osama Ibrahim  photo
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly experienced, principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors, biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bio-conversion, and analytical biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new start up biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

High intense-sweeteners (HIS) provide sweet without calories. The first intense-sweetener is Saccharine that was discovered in 1878 and since then, a number of other low-calorie sweeteners including: peptides structures (Aspartame, Neotame and Alitame), natural extracts (Stevia, Monk fruit Thaumatin and Brazzein) and chemically synthesized (Sucralose, Acesulfame-K, and Cyclamate) have been produced and used around the world. Levels of intense sweeteners used in food production are based on the approved daily intake by food safety Authority. This daily intake level is 100 fold lower than the safe dose demonstrated in studies. In this presentation, chemical structures, manufacturing process, regulatory status and applications in food and drinks for these above intense-sweeteners will be presented with complete details.

Keynote Forum

Claus Muss

International Research Group of Applied Preventive Medicine
Austria

Keynote: Clinical assessment of neutraceuticals in Europe by EFSA

Time : 12:00-12:25

OMICS International Food Technology-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Claus Muss  photo
Biography:

Claus Muss has completed his doctorates in Medical School Munich and Veterinary School Berlin and his Ph.D. in Public Health Science at St. Elisabeth University Bratislava (SK) where after habilitation he was appointed as associate Professor. Besides his clinical activities in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, he is head of the world wide networking International Research group of applied Preventive Medicine, Coauthor of 7 scientific journals with over 87 own publications.

Abstract:

In the European Union the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is the corner stone of risk assessment regarding food. Inaugurated in January 2002, following a series of food crises in the late 1990s, as an independent source of scientific advice and communication on risks associated with the food chain the goal of EFSA is to improve EU food safety. EFSA produces scientific opinions and advice to provide a sound foundation for European policies and legislation and to support the European Commission, European Parliament and EU Member States in taking effective and timely risk management decisions. This Authority performs environmental risk assessments and its advice underpins the European food safety system. EFSA has also provided scientific advice on the setting of tolerable upper levels of intakes (UL) for vitamins and minerals. These Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) represent the highest level of daily intake of a nutrient that is likely to pose no risk of adverse health effects in Europe. The Regulation on nutrition and health claims made on foods was adopted by the Council and Parliament in 2006. In this frame work of European Food safety assessment I-GAP offers manufacturers and food industry to profile fitting products by preparing EFSA proposals and conducting clinical human trials as well as to document the results in an approvable manner. For this reason I-GAP is closely linked with highly cited and pub med listed scientific journals.